RETAIL NEWS

LabCorp at Walgreens expands into Florida

BY DSN STAFF

On the heels of revealing a new pilot program to lower SKU counts per store, Walgreens and LabCorp have announced the expansion of the LabCorp at Walgreens into Florida. Ten new patient service centers will open within the Deerfield, Ill.-based retailer’s stores between April and May, with four locations serving the Gainesville market and two each in the Palm Beach, Pasco and Orlando areas.

These new locations join the previously announced Denver and North Carolina sites, which opened in 2017 and offers patients a secure, comfortable environment for specimen collection.

“We’ve had an outstanding experience with the six LabCorp at Walgreens locations that opened last year,” David P. King, LabCorp’s chairman and CEO, said. “Patients and physicians have responded enthusiastically to having access to lab testing in a high-quality health care setting. The success of those initial sites and the overwhelmingly positive market response caused us to make the decision to expand this initiative to Florida. The LabCorp at Walgreens partnership is a key pillar of our commitment to engage directly with consumers, supporting our mission to improve health and improve lives.”
The new Florida locations for LabCorp a Walgreens will be:

Gainesville area:

  • 7520 W Newberry Road, Gainesville
  • 2415 SW 75Th Street, Gainesville
  • 3909 NW 13Th Street, Gainesville
  • 15155 NW US Highway 441, Alachua

Pasco County area:

  • 1841 Little Road, Trinity
  • 5432 Little Road, New Port Richey

Palm Beach County area:

  • 15055 Jog Road, Delray Beach
  • 3003 Yamato Road, Boca Raton

Orlando area:

  • 2000 Howell Branch Road, Winter Park
  • 7815 South U.S. Highway 17/92, Fern Park

“Our initial pilot locations with LabCorp have been well-received and demonstrate that customers appreciate a greater level of access to important health care services,” Nimesh Jhaveri, vice president of healthcare service at Walgreens, said. “The LabCorp at Walgreens centers are a strong complement to our core pharmacy services and expertise, and another way in which we’re working with partners to bring health care closer to our patients in the community.”

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SLIDESHOW: NACDS Annual 2018 Monday – At the Cabanas

BY DSN STAFF

PALM BEACH, Fla.  — Despite the threat of rain at the Breakers over the weekend, the Cabanas were busy with Strategic Exchange Appointments during the 2018 NACDS Annual Meeting.

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On the offensive

The end of brick-and-mortar retail may not be imminent, if retailers play their cards right

BY Seth Mendelson

Well, from my angle, the sky is not falling for the brick-and-mortar retail industry — at least, not yet. How do I know? I spent two solid weekend days in two different malls and three supermarkets a few weeks ago. I expected the malls to be crowded, but what I found were businesses that were overloaded with shoppers, cash registers humming and a general feeling among the store operators that things were good. For a moment, at least, I felt I was back in 1997.

First, I had to park a football field or two away from the buildings, and when I finally got in, the places were packed with people and, trust me, they were not just sightseeing or people-watching. They were walking around buying products, made clearly evident by the number of consumers with shopping bags in their hands at the mall and the crazy checkout lines at the food store.

This was not the week before Thanksgiving or Christmas. It was in mid-March in suburban New Jersey where the outside temperatures hovered around 50 degrees.

Let’s be clear: The digital era is here to stay, and these online retailers will gain their fair share of sales from consumers who are either looking for a great deal, too lazy to get off the couch or simply surfing the web. Plus, Amazon and others are making it very easy for consumers to shop their sites.

But traditional retail has its advantages, too. The big one is that people do not want to simply sit in their homes in front of a computer buying products, no matter what the advantages are. They want to go out and they want to go shopping to see what is new, what is hot and, yes, what other people are wearing and buying. We have heard a lot about the coming death of the American shopping mall. Perhaps only the poorly operated ones with few amenities are really dying.

As we enter the final day of NACDS Annual Meeting here in Palm Beach, Fla., perhaps it is time that our industry officials at this show recognize that there is still a lot to be gained out in the marketplace. The economy is humming along nicely and, hence, most consumers are in the mood to shop and buy.

Let’s stop being on the defensive and go on the offensive.

Consumers want to go to your store. But you have to do your part, which means a combination of carrying the right merchandise at the right price and in a convenient, clean environment. Just as importantly, it means that retailers need to make their stores more exciting to the shopper.

Putting merchandise on store shelves — even at great price points — does not work anymore. That is even true for the titans of our industry, some of which built their entire business model on low prices. Now, it has to be an experience for the shopper that entertains them as they shop, and makes them feel that the retailer is pulling out all the stops to get them as much information as possible about categories and individual products.

Take the right steps, and shoppers will keep coming back to the stores they know so well. Make a few hiccups, and these same people may look to another place for their needs. The onus is on the retail world.

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