News

Kuske out at Katz, company confirms

BY Jim Frederick

MARKHAM, Ont. Retail pharmacy veteran Jerry Kuske has left Katz Group Canada, two sources within the company confirmed this afternoon.

No reason was given for Kuske’s departure from Katz, where he served as executive vice president and chief merchandising officer. Also unclear are the highly experienced executive’s future plans.

“His last day was Friday,” said one Katz staff member who worked closely with the senior executive.

Katz Group spokesperson Michelle Lee confirmed the move late this afternoon. “Following five years with Katz Group Canada, Jerry Kuske has left the organization,” Lee acknowledged in response to a query from Drug Store News. “We thank Jerry for his valuable contributions and hard work.”

Lee said the company “will be conducting a search for a new executive vice president, chief merchandising officer in the new year.”

For the past five years, Kuske served as top merchant for the huge drug store conglomerate, which operates more than 1,800 drug stores in Canada and the United States under a variety of banners including Rexall, Pharma Plus, Medicine Shoppe and Drug Trading in Canada, and Snyder’s Drug Stores in the United States. The move was handled quietly: although Katz Group’s vendor community was informed of Kuske’s abrupt departure on Dec. 5, no official press announcement was made.

Kuske came to Katz via another American retail veteran, Katz president and chief executive officer Andy Giancamilli, and helped lead the revitalization of the company’s flagship drug store prototype and merchandising strategy under the rejuvenated Rexall brand. By blending United States and Canadian merchandising and marketing concepts, he and other Katz executives developed a fresh approach to drug store retailing north of the border and made Rexall the company’s flagship brand and prototype concept.

Kuske brought to Katz Group a diverse background in retailing, having served with Ahold USA, Kmart Corp., Perry Drug Stores and Pay Less NW. He came to Katz five years ago from Ahold USA, where he was senior vice president of general merchandise. Prior to that he worked with Perry and with Kmart, where he rose to become senior vice president and general merchandise manager for hardlines. Kuske’s early career was spent with PayLess in Oregon.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Management shakeup continues at Sanofi-Aventis

BY Jim Frederick

PARIS Drug maker Sanofi-Aventis SA said Wednesday that its top legal and financial officer has stepped down, extending a management shuffle that led to the appointment of a new chief executive, GlaxoSmithKline PLC veteran Chris Viehbacher, Dec. 1.

In the latest change, Sanofi announced the abrupt resignation yesterday of Jean-Claude Leroy, a 23-year company veteran who last served as executive vice president of finance and legal affairs. As of Dec. 10, His replacements are Laurence Debroux, senior vice president and chief financial officer, and Karen Linehan, senior vice president of legal affairs and general counsel.

Both have been named to Sanofi-Aventis’ executive committee and group management committee, and will report directly to the company’s new CEO, the French-based pharmaceutical firm announced.

Before coming to Sanofi, Viehbacher was president of North American pharmaceutical operations for GSK, and co-chairman of that company’s Portfolio Management Board, which oversees strategic decisions for research and development. At Sanofi, he’s expected to lead efforts to recharge the company’s drug-development pipeline and marketing prowess amid today’s difficult economic climate.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Report calls for better adolescent health care

BY Antoinette Alexander

WASHINGTON Reform is needed in health care services for adolescents, who often engage in risky behavior, as the services and providers that are needed and used by adolescents are often fragmented, resulting in gaps in care, according to a new report from the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine.

While most U.S. adolescents (those aged 10 to 19) are healthy, many engage in risky behavior, develop unhealthy habits and have physical and mental conditions that can jeopardize their health. 

“As policymakers discuss how to restructure the way healthcare is delivered in the U.S., the distinct problems faced by adolescents‹such as risky behavior‹deserve particular attention. And because adolescence is a critical period for developing habits that build a strong foundation for health throughout one?s entire life, services need to focus on promoting healthy behaviors, preventing disease and managing health conditions,” stated committee chair Robert Lawrence, professor of environmental health sciences and health policy at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. 

Furthermore, the various services and providers that are needed and used by adolescents are often fragmented, resulting in gaps in care. For example, specialty services in mental health, sexual health, oral health and substance abuse treatment are not accessible to most adolescents.

The report suggests that a system be developed that fosters coordination between primary and specialty care; it should also include opportunities for primary care services to reach adolescents through safety-net settings, such as hospitals and community health centers and programs. Also, a stronger focus is needed on meeting the needs of adolescents who may be especially vulnerable to risky behavior or poor health‹for example, those who are poor, recent immigrants or those in foster care.

Federal and state policy makers also should develop strategies to ensure that all adolescents have comprehensive, continuous health insurance coverage, the report states. More than five million Americans aged 10 to 19 are uninsured and they use care less often and are less likely to have a regular source of primary care than those young people who are insured.

To improve the skills of health professionals to interact effectively with this age group, the report recommends that regulatory bodies incorporate competencies in adolescent care in their licensing, certification and accreditation requirements. Also, public and private funders should provide financial support to expand and sustain interdisciplinary training programs in adolescent health.

It is also recommended that, as an overarching principle, adolescents give their own consent before their health information is shared with others, even their parents, according to the report.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?