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Kinney Drugs appoints Jim Spencer as COO

BY Antoinette Alexander

GOUVERNEUR, N.Y. — Kinney Drugs announced on Tuesday that Jim Spencer, formerly VP retail operations, has been promoted to COO.

He will report to Bridget-ann Hart, president of Kinney Healthcare Services. In his new position, Spencer is responsible for overseeing retail and pharmacy store operations and the retail merchandising department. He is responsible for the ongoing development of pharmacy and retail services.

“Jim is a results-driven leader who has been a significant contributor to the success of our retail business since becoming part of the Kinney Drugs team,” Hart said. “We are confident that his vision and leadership as COO will drive future success and growth for the company.”
 
Spencer joined Kinney Drugs in 2010 and has more than 20 years of operations experience within the retail industry.

Kinney Drugs currently operates 94 stores in central and northern New York and Vermont.

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NPD Group: Men’s grooming market grows at rapid pace

BY Antoinette Alexander

PORT WASHINGTON, N.Y. — The men’s grooming market continues to grow at a rapid pace as research shows that men’s grooming tools — such as electric shavers, men’s trimmers and home hair clippers — are among the largest dollar growth drivers in the overall personal care industry. Meanwhile, such product categories as men’s facial skin care continue to flourish.

Recent figures on men’s grooming tools and products released by the NPD Group, a market research company, revealed men continue to discover the benefits of keeping up appearances. NPD credited the influence of popular culture — and specifically, the increased appearance of facial hair on the red carpet — for the rise in men’s grooming tool sales. Recent results in this category also show men want to control hair growth on the body, as well as the face.

According to NPD’s consumer tracking service:

  • In the 12 months ended in June, sales of men’s electric shavers and men’s trimmers gained 9% and 12% in dollar sales, respectively. Facial trimmers grew 13% in dollar sales;

  • Pen trimmers and nose/ear trimmers together accounted for 13% of men’s trimmer dollars and increased 22% and 19% in units, respectively;

  • Body groomers gained nearly 16% in unit sales in the 12 months ended in June; and

  • Body groomers skew toward the under-35 age group and are even more popular among men under 25 years of age.

“Even though the overall personal care industry is currently flat, the men’s grooming categories are showing healthy growth,” stated Debra Mednick, executive director of NPD’s home business. “Men are purchasing the tools to help them get their look and looking good sells.”

Unlike women, men’s options are limited when it comes to covering up skin irritations, such as razor burn, nicks and acne. Survey results confirm men are more educated now than ever before about skin care problems and solutions.

According to NPD’s men’s grooming consumer report:

 

  • More than 9-out-of-10 men use some sort of grooming products today;

  • The men’s grooming industry generated $964 million in U.S. department store sales in 2011, an increase of 11%, compared with 2010;

  • Facial cleansers (excluding bar soap), facial lotions/moisturizers and lip products are the most commonly used products among male facial skin care users;

  • Men’s facial skin care grew 11% in dollars in 2011; and

  • Facial skin care product users are more likely to be ethnic men and men ages 18 to 34 years.

“Men have become increasingly conscious of the perks associated with looking good,” added Karen Grant, VP and senior global industry analyst at NPD. “They have a heightened awareness that looking good may provide them an advantage in the workplace as well as in their personal lives.”

“Men have different skin than women and the men’s grooming brands need to continue educating them as well as make them feel comfortable in the shopping environment to gain sales in this category,” Grant said.

 

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Report: South Carolina allowing clinics to enroll as providers in Medicaid

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Beginning this month, South Carolina is allowing retail-based health clinics to enroll as providers in Medicaid, a move that will enable Medicaid patients to use clinics for wellness visits, preventive services and to treat acute ailments, according to a local news report.

According to The Post and Courier, South Carolina Medicaid director Tony Keck said the move is designed to expand access to care and keep those patients with basic health issues from using high-cost emergency departments.

The state currently has 25 retail-based health clinics, all of them CVS Caremark-owned MinuteClinics.

Keck, who has stern words for those physicians who may oppose the state’s decision, told the newspaper that state officials began discussing retail clinics at his request earlier this year.

“You guys [physicians] close at 4:30,” Keck was quoted as saying in the article. “People work during the day. They need some place to go after hours instead of the [emergency room]. We need to make it available to them.”

According to the article, some within the medical community have expressed concern over whether the state’s move would lead “to a fracturing of health care for South Carolina’s patients.”

Responding to those concerns, Tine Hansen-Turton, executive director of the Convenient Care Association, told the publication that clinics are “a resource, not a medical home.”

“We don’t want to be the only sources of heath care,” she was quoted as saying.

In a statement sent to the publication, Andrew Sussman, president of MinuteClinic and SVP/associate chief medical officer of CVS Caremark, said the company plans to open new clinics in Fort Mill later this month and in Bluffton this fall. Further expansion could happen later this year and early next year, he said, as part of the company’s plan to add 100 clinics a year through 2015.

“As thousands of South Carolinians acquire insurance as a result of health care reform, we think MinuteClinic can play an increasing role in expanding access to high-quality, convenient and affordable care,” Sussman was quoted as saying in a prepared statement.

MinuteClinic already is considered “in network” for some South Carolina Medicaid patients who have managed care plans, the article stated, and Medicaid programs in several other states already cover care at retail-based health clinics.

To read the full article click here.


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