HEALTH

Kimberly-Clark introduces latest in incontinence wear

BY Michael Johnsen

DALLAS  — Kimberly-Clark on Monday introduced the new Depend Silhouette Active Fit briefs, a moderate-absorbency brief featuring a thin design for complete comfort and an underwear-like look, fit and feel. A category first, this new product is available in beige and black colors. The launch of Silhouette Active Fit briefs comes in the 2nd year of Underwareness – the largest effort to date, created by Depend, to help break down the stigma surrounding bladder leakage while supporting the millions of people who experience it.
 
“For the past 31 years, the Depend brand has led the incontinence category by introducing product innovations and dignified solutions that continuously help meet consumers’ needs and help manage their bladder leakage,” said Elizabeth Metz, Depend brand director, Kimberly-Clark. “With the launch of new Silhouette Active Fit briefs, we want to give women who experience bladder leakage the comfort, protection and confidence they deserve and we’re thrilled to be able to offer yet another product that helps them live a vibrant, fulfilled life.”
 
The launch of Silhouette Active Fit briefs in year two of Underwareness includes support from renowned fashion expert Carson Kressley, entertainer and celebrity television host Sheryl Underwood and talk show host and practicing urologist Jennifer Berman. They, along with the Depend brand, will encourage consumers to experience the difference of Silhouette Active Fit briefs and show their support for those experiencing bladder leakage by sharing photos and videos on social media using #Underwareness. For each share, the Depend brand will continue to donate $1, up to a cumulative total of $3 million through 2016, to The Simon Foundation for Continence and United Way Worldwide.
 
“I’m passionate about empowering women to feel their best by helping them feel confident in what they’re wearing,” said Kressley. “Women with bladder leakage will be thrilled to learn about Depend Silhouette Active Fit briefs because the product is smooth under clothes – whether that’s a pair of yoga pants at the gym, a pencil skirt for work or a dress for date night.” 
 
Underwood will support the second year of Underwareness by continuing to share her personal experience with bladder leakage and encouraging other women with the condition to try Silhouette Active Fit briefs.
 
“It’s time people realize that bladder leakage doesn’t mean you have to live a hidden or inactive lifestyle. Look at me as an example – by using Depend products, I feel feminine and free, I’m able to walk the red carpet, I exercise regularly and I work on TV and radio shows without slowing down,” said Underwood. “And I’m so excited Depend Silhouette Active Fit briefs come in black and beige colors – I’ve been dreaming of a product like this for years, because it’s comfortable and it looks like real underwear.”
 
The launch of Depend Silhouette Active Fit briefs and year two of Underwareness commercial program includes a robust digital presence, a top-tier presence at BlogHer 2015, TV advertising, digital partnerships, product sampling and retail support.
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

NY AG brings herbal supplement fight to Congress

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK —– As part of the latest salvo from Attorney General Eric Schneiderman of New York against the dietary supplement industry, Schneiderman announced Thursday he and Attorney General Greg Zoeller of Indiana today are leading a bipartisan group of 14 attorneys general calling on Congressional leaders to launch a comprehensive inquiry into the herbal supplements industry. The group has sent a letter asking for Congress to consider a more robust oversight role for the Food and Drug Administration with respect to herbal supplements. 
 
“It is unfortunate that the New York State Attorney General has spearheaded a request for Congress to spend taxpayers’ money to ‘launch a comprehensive congressional inquiry into the herbal supplements industry’ when the industry is already amply regulated on a federal level by FDA and FTC," charged Steve Mister, president and CEO of the Council for Responsible Nutrition. "In fact, concerns raised in that letter about alleged widespread safety issues are not true, based on government’s post-market surveillance system which demonstrates relatively few safety issues for these products, particularly in comparison to other industries regulated by FDA."
 
Mister noted that the "serious concerns" raised by Schneiderman have been widely criticized not only by the supplements industry, but also critics of the herbal supplements industry and a number of journalists. 
 
"Despite these considerable doubts, the NY AG refuses to share his test results and methodology with FDA, with the media who continue to report on this story, with the companies implicated in those results, or even with the other state AGs he has persuaded to join in his campaign. In fact, an agreement between the NY AG and one of these companies earlier in the week explicitly stated that there were no issues with the herbal supplements being investigated, and because of this, the products were returned to the store shelves."
 
“Attorney General Schneiderman has admitted that the federal Good Manufacturing Practices currently in place for dietary supplements are sufficient, and companies such as GNC are in compliance with those, but yet he moves forward in his request to spend federal taxpayer dollars on an investigation into an industry that is fully regulated by the FDA," added Daniel Fabricant, CEO and executive director of the Natural Products Association. "The Natural Products Association regards this most recent action by Attorney General Schneiderman as added harassment based on science fiction. For the past two months, the attorney general has continued to escalate his attack on the supplement industry without any legitimate data to back up his arguments.
 
“My focus is on ensuring the best consumer protections for dietary and herbal supplements, and eliminating potential false or deceptive labeling that could be harmful to consumers,” said Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller. “My fellow attorneys general and I are urging Congress to consider stronger federal oversight of the herbal supplements industry so that members of the public have full information about a product they are ingesting.”
 
The letter to Congressional leaders is co-signed by Attorneys General George Jepsen, D-Conn.; Karl Racine, D-D.C.; David Louie, D-Hawaii; Lawrence Wasden, R-Idaho; Greg Zoeller, R-Ind.; Tom Miller, D-Iowa; Jack Conway, D-Ky.; Maura Healey, D-Mass.; Jim Hood, D-Miss.; Joseph Foster, D-N.H.; Joey San Nicolas, D-Northern Mariana Islands; Kathleen Kane, D-Pa.; and Peter Kilmartin, D-R.I. 
 
In February of 2015, Schneiderman asked major retailers to halt the sale of certain herbal supplements following DNA tests that failed to detect plant materials listed on the labels of the majority of products tested. Earlier this month, Schneiderman announced the formation of a multi-state coalition as part of an expanded probe of the herbal supplement industry.
 
Earlier this week Schneiderman announced a historic agreement with GNC to implement landmark reforms for herbal supplements. Under the agreement, GNC, one of the nation’s largest supplement retailers, will use DNA barcoding to authenticate plants used in supplements and adopt new testing standards to prevent contamination. 
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Medical coalition targets blood pressure of 130/80 for heart disease patients

BY Michael Johnsen

DALLAS — A new scientific statement issued jointly by three medical organizations earlier this week and published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension, addresses how low to aim when treating patients with high blood pressure who also have vascular diseases.
 
The document provides an up-to-date summary on treating hypertension in patients who have both high blood pressure and have had a stroke, heart attack or some other forms of heart disease, said Elliott Antman, president of the American Heart Association and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
 
“The writing committee reinforces the target of less than 140/90 to prevent heart attacks and strokes in patients with hypertension and coronary artery disease,” he said. “This is important since confusion has arisen in the clinical community over the last year regarding the appropriate target for blood pressure management in the general population.”
 
The current statement is issued jointly by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology and American Society of Hypertension. The writing committee consisted of internationally recognized experts in the fields of cardiology and high blood pressure research.
 
According to the statement, while a target of less than 140/90 is reasonable to avoid heart attacks and strokes, a lower target of less than 130/80 may be appropriate in some individuals with heart disease who have already experienced a stroke, heart attack or mini-stroke or who have other cardiovascular conditions such as a narrowing of leg arteries or abdominal aortic aneurysm.
 
Blood-pressure lowering can be done safely, and the vast majority of individuals will not experience problems when standard medications are used, the committee wrote. However, the statement recommended that clinicians use caution in patients with coronary artery blockages, advising that blood pressure should be lowered slowly, and not strive to decrease the diastolic (lower number) blood pressure to less than 60 mm Hg, particularly in patients more than 60 years old.
 
The statement offers specific, evidence-based recommendations and contraindications to help clinicians select which anti-hypertensive medications to use in patients with various types of heart disease. For most patients, that will mean taking a beta-blocker by itself or in combination with other classes of drugs.
 
“In the spectrum of drugs available for the treatment of hypertension, beta-blockers assume center stage in patients with coronary artery disease,” said Clive Rosendorff, chair of the writing committee, professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, and director of graduate medical education at the Veterans Administration in the Bronx. In addition to their effect on blood pressure, beta-blockers slow the heart rate and reduce the force of cardiac contraction, both of which reduce the heart’s consumption of oxygen. They also increase blood flow to the heart by prolonging the time between contractions, which is when blood flows into the heart muscle.
 
“In addition to treating hypertension, this statement also recognizes the importance of modifying other risk factors for heart attack, stroke and other vascular disease, including abdominal obesity, abnormal cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking,” Rosendorff said.
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?