HEALTH

Jerry Barnes receives lifetime achievement award from GMDC

BY Michael Johnsen

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. The Global Market Development Center last week awarded its 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award to Jerry Barnes at its Health Beauty Wellness Marketing Conference in Orlando, Fla.

GMDC annually bestows this honor on a person who has contributed significantly to the general merchandise and health, beauty and wellness industries, as well as to GMDC through his or her leadership.

“Jerry’s contributions have been very unique, as he served as a key leader as both a member and as a senior manager on our staff,” stated David McConnell, GMDC president. “Jerry had a very successful career inside the industry, which began in the late 1960s when he joined Fleming Foods in Topeka, Kan. In 1982, he left Fleming to go to Carr-Gottstein Foods in Anchorage, Alaska, where he served as corporate VP merchandising and GMDC’s chairman,” McDonnell added. “I think Jerry did his most significant work on behalf of GMDC when, as chairman of the board, he helped facilitate the merger between GMDC and the former National Association of Service Merchandising in 1994. In his many years as a staff member, he has truly served as a catalyst for membership growth and expansion as he’s captured the trust of the membership through his knowledge of the business and passion for GMDC.”

Jerry Barnes has been a regular participant at GMDC Marketing Conferences for more than 20 years and served as chairman of the association in 1994. Since 1996 he has served on the GMDC staff in his role as VP member services.

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Abbott debuts EAS Peak

BY Michael Johnsen

ABBOTT PARK, Ill. Abbott on Monday announced the introduction of EAS Peak, a sports nutrition performance beverage that contains the company’s P3 technology, formulations that help sustain energy, increase workout capacity and protect muscles from breakdown. The P3 technology is a proprietary blend of beta-alanine, isomaltulose and HMB (beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate).

 

“Muscle fatigue and breakdown occurs with exercise – the harder you work out the more your muscles are affected,” noted Keith Wheeler, divisional VP performance nutrition research, development and scientific affairs at Abbott. “Leveraging years of nutrition science and experience with ingredients such as HMB, we’ve brought together a blend in the P3 technology that can help deliver extended energy, delayed muscle fatigue and reduced muscle breakdown. Using EAS Peak before a workout can help athletes prepare for, perform during and recover following a workout or competition.”

 

 

EAS Peak also is a source of high-quality protein (10g per serving). The ready-to-drink beverage contains 25 g carbohydrates (15 g isomaltulose), 150 calories and less than 1 g fat to provide energy and help support lean muscle recovery and replenishment following physical activity. The 16-oz., caffeine-free beverage is available in orange spark, peach surge and fruit power flavors.

 

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SymphonyIRI examines lower-income shoppers’ spending habits

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO Even in a challenging and rapidly changing marketplace, lower-income shoppers will generate $115 billion in incremental spending during the next decade, the SymphonyIRI Group reported Monday in its fourth annual research report, “The Lower-Income Shopper Report: Serving Lower-Income/Multicultural Shopper Micro-Segments.” Yet, they are one of the most misunderstood, ethnically diverse and underserved shopper segments in the United States, SymphonyIRI added.

“Many retailers and manufacturers take a one-size-fits-all approach to reaching lower-income shoppers, but with a $115 billion opportunity at stake and increasing competition to win their share of wallet, a mass market view of these shoppers will not be enough to win their loyalty,” stated Sean Seitzinger, partner, Symphony Consulting at SymphonyIRI Group. “Only those retailers and manufacturers that embrace a micro-segmentation strategy to truly understand the needs and wants of these varied, nuanced and multicultural shopper groups will be able to serve them effectively and profitably.”

“The ‘Lower-Income Shopper Report’ exemplifies our continuing commitment to be industry leaders in providing actionable thought leadership to the [consumer packaged good] industry,” noted Krishnakumar Davey, managing director, Symphony Consulting at SymphonyIRI Group. “Specifically, this report will help the industry better understand the current and emerging needs of lower-income shoppers, so that retailers and manufacturers can tailor their offerings for the varied lower-income/multicultural microsegments.”

The “Lower-Income Shopper Report” is built on a four-year history of shopper behavior across five lower-income/multicultural segments — Hispanic households, African American households, young households ages 25 to 34 years, older/senior households ages 65 years and older, and households with children — and examined what is important to each group and what it will take to be successful in serving their changing needs.

Lower-income consumers frequently shop but generally spend less per trip than average, often shopping only with a paycheck or pocket cash. African-American lower-income consumers make the most retail shopping trips per year with 177 trips. Seniors make 169 trips, and Hispanics make 168. Lower-income households with children spend the most at $39.65 per trip, followed by younger households at $37.58.

Although lower- and higher-income shoppers both report careful trip planning, more than half routinely make unplanned purchases while in the store. At the same time, 49% of lower-income shoppers are much more likely to track their spending during the trip and make budget driven decisions on the fly, versus 38% of higher-income shoppers.

Over the past two years, half of lower-income shoppers report that they have decreased spending in discretionary areas, including home furnishings and furniture, in order to better afford essentials, such as food and health care. For example, spending on clothing and shoes has decreased by 43%, while spending on food and beverages and healthcare products has increased by 31% and 27%, respectively.

In selecting individual products in the store, lower- and higher-income shoppers are heavily influenced by promotional pricing and products for which they have a coupon. Higher-income shoppers more likely are to be influenced by past usage, TV and print advertising, and recommendations from friends.

Lower-income shoppers across the board are turning to private-label products to save money; however, there are some nuances regarding private-label attitudes. For instance, 29% of older lower-income households think name brands are worth the extra price versus 46% of African-Americans, who appear to the be the most brand loyal micro segment.

In addition, 64% of younger households and households with children are willing to sacrifice quality to get a better price on a product versus 51% of older households. And, 70% of households with children will switch to another brand if it’s cheaper versus 60% of African-Americans.

Fitting the diverse nature of lower-income households, their lifestyles and attitudes toward health vary broadly. For example, 76% of older households said eating healthy is important versus 65% of younger households. On the opposite end of the spectrum, only 41% of older households said projecting a good image is important, versus 64% of African-Americans and 62% of households with children.

When shopping for specific products, better-for-you attributes are important to all microsegments but with important variations. Older households are primarily focused on whole grains/high fiber and weight-management attributes, while Hispanics place a higher relative importance on natural foods, super foods and those enriched with protein.

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