HEALTH

JAMA article points to pharmacy’s role in MTM, improved patient care system

BY Jim Frederick

ALEXANDRIA, Va. The drumbeat in support of an expanded, universally recognized role for pharmacists in helping patients successfully manage their drug therapy is getting steadily louder.

The latest note of support comes from the chief voice of the nation’s physician community, the Journal of the American Medical Association. In an Oct. 13 article, JAMA points to community pharmacists as a key resource to help bridge the gap between doctor and patient, particularly for patients treated by more than one specialist in an often disconnected and dysfunctional health care network.

The article, titled “Medication Use in Older Patients: Better Policy Could Encourage Better Practice,” was hailed by the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Thursday as “further validation of the need for public policy to embrace pharmacists’ expertise in helping patients take their medications correctly.” What’s more, notes the group, the points made by JAMA author Jerry Avorn, MD, are “consistent with NACDS’ ongoing campaign to raise awareness of … medication adherence to help boost health and reduce healthcare costs.”

Avorn highlights both the critical value of drug therapy and the need for accessible, community-based health professionals, such as pharmacists and nurses, to augment a more effective, patient-centric health system. “The use of medications in older patients,” he wrote, “is arguably the single most important health care intervention in the industrialized world.”  However, he noted that “dys-organization” in healthcare delivery is “particularly problematic for complex patients with several chronic conditions who take multiple medications, often provided by numerous specialists in little or no contact with one another — a recipe for pharmacological chaos.”

Avorn “specifically mentions pharmacists as a solution,” NACDS pointed out. “Although the 2010 healthcare legislation did not reform the delivery system, it did provide for small pilot studies of ‘medical homes’ that could address the fragmentation of care that so often defeats the provision of integrated, coherent drug regimens for elderly patients with complex health care needs,” the author writes. “Solutions could be designed-in as these systems develop in several ways. Pharmacists and nurses could work with physicians to develop, implement, and monitor drug regimens.”

NACDS president and CEO Steven Anderson found plenty to like with that approach. “NACDS is 100-percent committed to unleashing the power of pharmacy to help improve lives and to reduce the estimated $290 billion in annual costs — 13% of all healthcare expenditures — related to not taking medications correctly,” he said. “This effort is resulting in consistent progress, such as the advancement of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management that provides a methodical approach to increasing medication adherence.”

To that end, noted Anderson, “The article in the Journal of the American Medical Association is yet another drumbeat that should continue to inspire action for further progress in public policy.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Boogies be gone

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK Little Busy Bodies has brought to the market Achooz, a saline nose wipe aimed at adults, following its success with its for-kids version Boogie Wipes.

The saline solution is ideal for dissolving dried mucus, the company noted. Pictured here on a clip-strip, Little Busy Bodies’ pathway to success may mirror that of Airborne, as the line of kids and adult nasal wipes was developed by two moms.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Cub Foods addresses gluten allergies with diet management program

BY Allison Cerra

STILLWATER, Minn. Supervalu’s Cub Foods is looking to help customers with gluten sensitivity with the launch of a new, informative diet management program at its stores located in Minnesota, Illinois and Wisconsin.

Developed by Supervalu’s health-and-wellness team and dietitians, the program will roll out in phases over the next three months. The program will present in-store signage about gluten-free foods in Cub Foods stores — as well as in Supervalu’s family of other stores — and also will feature gluten-free shopping lists and guides. In addition to recipes, more extensive gluten-free shopping lists and snack and meal solutions will be available on the stores’ websites.

The new program builds on Supervalu’s Nutrition iQ program, an in-store nutrition ratings system to help customers identify healthy food choices.

“For people suffering from gluten intolerance, eating foods with gluten causes inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine, which can result in nutrients passing through the body without being absorbed. This may contribute to other health concerns, including malnutrition, some types of cancers and a variety of autoimmune diseases,” said Anthony Provenzano, Supervalu pharmacy director of clinical programs. “As a whole, the U.S. population is seeing an uptick in gluten intolerance, and there are many more people who have it — but don’t know it. This program is designed to help people manage a gluten-free diet and hopefully encourage others to seek advice from a healthcare professional about a possible sensitivity to gluten.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?