PHARMACY

Innovation founder, chairman Boyer dies

BY DSN STAFF

Innovation has announced that its founder and chairman Joseph “Harry” Boyer has died. Boyer, who started the PharmASSIST maker in 1972 as Innovation Associates, passed away at his home in Johnson City, N.Y., on Jan. 30 following a long illness.

When Boyer started the company, it was as a research and development engineering, technical services and manufacturing firm. In 1995, Boyer shifted the focus to pharmacy automation, introducing the PharmASSIST technology at the National Association of Chain Drug Stores’ Pharmacy and Technology conference in Boston. Since then the company has grown into a solutions company for high-volume pharmacies in need of automation that has seen more than 2000 installations worldwide.

While leading the company, Boyer received various accolades, including the New York State Small Business Person of the Year and the Broome County Chamber of Commerce Small Business Person of the Year awards, both of which he received in 2004. He also created a strategic partnership with Binghamton University’s Thomas J. Watson Institute of Systems Excellence, through which Innovation and the university have collaborated on big data analysis, visual process simulation and artificial intelligence. In 2011, in recognition of Boyer’s efforts, the university awarded him the Binghamton University Technical Innovator of the Year award.

“Mr. Boyer was a longstanding and steadfast champion of our academic endeavors. He has positively impacted the lives of numerous students, faculty, and staff,” Binghamton WISE dean Krishnaswam (Hari) Srihari said. “Personally, I would consider him to be a mentor and a friend, a person whose life was an example for all of us. He will be sorely missed.”

Services will be held at Johnson City’s J.F. Rice Funeral Home on Feb. 2 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. followed by a funeral mass at St. James Catholic Church on Feb. 3 at 10 a.m. The family requested that donations to the Alzheimer’s Association be considered in lieu of flowers.

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Perrigo gets tentative approval for generic Soolantra

BY DSN STAFF

The Food and Drug Administration has given its tentative approval to Perrigo’s generic Soolantra (ivermectin, 1%) cream. Perrigo said that it has previously settled litigation with Galderma Labs, Galderma SA and Nestle Skin Health for the product.

Perrigo’s generic Soolantra is indicated to treat inflammatory rosacea lesions. The product had U.S. sales of $120 million for the past 12 months, according to IQVIA data. This tentative approval is one in a string of FDA nods Perrigo’s products have received recently.

“This is the Rx team’s fifth generic product approval this month,” Perrigo executive vice president and president Rx pharmaceuticals John Wesolowski said. “This tentative approval further illustrates our commitment to advancing our new product pipeline and providing savings to patients and healthcare systems.”

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Imprimis compounding 2 glaucoma drugs in short supply

BY David Salazar

Ophthalmology-focused company Imprimis Pharmaceuticals is dispensing alternatives to glaucoma treatments recently added to the Food and Drug Administration’s Drug Shortage List. The company has begun dispensing preservative-free dorzolamide and preservative-free dorzolamide/timolol — the latter of which is a compounded version of a combination marketed as Cosopt and Cosopt PF.

Imprimis said that the two medications were prescribed roughly 4 million in 2017, according to data from IQVIA. The compounded formulations it’s offering are free of the preservative benzalkonium chloride, or BAK, which is often found in glaucoma treatments. A 2013 Clinical Ophthalmology paper attributed such adverse effects as conjunctival inflammation and fibrosis, macular edema and anterior chamber inflammation, among others, to BAK.

“These effects can lead to ocular discomfort, poor intraocular pressure control, glaucoma surgery failure, and decreased patient compliance,” the paper noted.

Imprimis said the compounded products are currently available.

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