News

Innovation boosts acne treatment sales

BY DSN STAFF

The acne treatment market has a history of solid sales, due largely to the teen population that tends to suffer the most from acne, and this year looks to be no exception thanks to launches and product innovation.

“The teen population positively impacts this market, as teens suffer from acne the most and constantly seek methods for diminishing the appearance of facial skin blemishes,” stated research group Mintel International in a recent report on the U.S. Medicated Skincare market.

In fact, at any given time some 17 million Americans, including 85 percent of teens and young adults age 12 to 24, are battling blemishes. Furthermore, Mintel’s analysis of the 2006 Simmons National Consumer Survey found that some 80 percent of teens report using facial cleansing and medicated facial products to combat acne.

This has helped spur double-digit sales growth in the segment between 2004 and 2006. Sales of acne treatments in 2006, according to Mintel, totaled $324 million, up 13.1 percent compared with $286 million in 2004.

Mintel added in the report, “2007 appears poised for strong sales as well, based on the 138 items rolled out in 2006.”

Helping to fuel growth is the fact that such celebrities as Jessica Simpson have opened up about their acne problems in ads for Proactiv. Teens always have suffered from acne, but they may feel more comfortable talking about solutions after seeing their icons step into the limelight.

Recognizing the opportunities that exist within the segment, many manufacturers have been working hard to develop new products, including systems that feature products designed to be used together to treat acne and, perhaps more recently, devices that use heat or light to treat acne.

Acne treatment sales

Source: IRI InfoScan/Mintel
Year Sales at current prices % prices change
2001 $230 million
2002 255 11%
2003 277 8.7
2004 286 3.2
2005 317 10.8
2006 324 2.1

One example is Therative, a developer of medical products. The company announced in August that its ThermaClear device now is sold at www.drugstore.com. The FDA-cleared hand-held consumer medical device promises to clear pimples up to four times faster than those left untreated.

In addition, Tyrell continues to promote its hand-held acne-clearing device called Zeno, which also works by using heat to treat bacteria. The device, which initially was available solely through physicians and medispas, entered the retail market in September 2006 with its launch at Walgreens. It has since expanded distribution to such pharmacy retailers as Longs Drug Stores and Rite Aid.

Earlier this year at NACDS Marketplace, Lumiport was on hand to highlight its dermastyle at-home treatment, which uses therapeutic light to zap zits. The blue light eliminates bacteria while the red light reduces inflammation and redness.

BY THE NUMBERS

13.1%Acne treatment product sales increase from 2004-2006

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Kroger appoints Going as Michigan division president

BY Adam Kraemer

CINCINNATI The Kroger Co. announced Wednesday that it has named Rick Going president of the company’s new Michigan division.

Kroger currently operates 138 stores in the state; Going will oversee operations in them, effective immediately.

During his 26-year tenure with Kroger, Going has held a number of district- and division-level leadership positions at the store and has served as vice president of Retail Operations and vice president of Merchandising for Kroger’s Cincinnati/Dayton division.

“Rick brings extensive experience in operations and merchandising to this new role,” said Don McGeorge, Kroger’s president and chief operating officer. “We look forward to his leadership as he works with our associates to build on Kroger’s growth in Michigan by focusing on our customers to create even better shopping experiences for them.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

NACDS responds to “misleading” New York Times article

BY DSN STAFF

ALEXANDRIA, Va. The National Association of Chain Drug Stores has fired back at The New York Times after the publication ran an article in its Sept. 18 issue titled, “The ‘Poisonous Cocktail’ of Multiple Drugs.”

The NACDS said the article misrepresented the role of chain pharmacies in the prevention of harmful drug interactions. The article blamed, “places where chain stores have replaced independent pharmacies or when the patient’s drug plan requires that medications be ordered by mail.” The NACDS retaliated by stating that all pharmacists, no matter whether they work in a chain or at an independent pharmacy, counsel patients for drug interactions and rely on medication information for this purpose.

The NACDS said the article misrepresented the role of chain pharmacies in the prevention of harmful drug interactions. The article blamed, “places where chain stores have replaced independent pharmacies or when the patient’s drug plan requires that medications be ordered by mail.” The NACDS retaliated by stating that all pharmacists, no matter whether they work in a chain or at an independent pharmacy, counsel patients for drug interactions and rely on medication information for this purpose.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?