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Industry vet Bob Long passes away

BY Antoinette Alexander

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Robert M. Long, former president, CEO and chairman of Longs Drug Stores passed away March 27 due to complications, which occurred as a result of inclusion body myositis.

Long was a well-known industry veteran having led Longs Drug Stores for more than 20 years. His retirement from the Walnut Creek, Calif.-based pharmacy retailer as CEO in 2000 marked the first time that a member of the founding family was not heading the company.

Long was elected to the board in 1968 and was elected president of Longs Drugs in 1975. In 1991, he was elected chairman and CEO. The Walnut Creek, Calif.-based pharmacy retailer had grown to 416 stores generating $3.7 billion in sales by 2000 when he relinquished the CEO title. Long continued to serve on the board as chairman from 2000 to 2003 and afterward as chairman emeritus. He stepped down from the board in 2007 at the age of 68.

When announcing Long’s retirement as chairman emeritus in 2007, then chairman, president and CEO of Longs Drug Stores, Warren Bryant said, “We are all very proud that we could open the 500th Longs Drugs and surpass $5 billion in sales before Bob announced his intentions to retire. The board of directors and the employees of Longs Drugs extend our deepest appreciation and gratitude for what Bob has contributed to the company that his father and uncle founded nearly 70 years ago.”

In 2008, CVS Caremark acquired Longs Drug Stores, folding into its portfolio Longs’ 521 retail locations in California, Hawaii, Nevada and Arizona, as well as its PBM services. CVS/ pharmacy still operates under the Longs Drug Store banner in Hawaii.

The Long family has not yet finalized plans for a memorial service. Expressions of condolences can be sent to:
 Office of Robert Long
, PO Box 3827, 
Walnut Creek, Calif., 94598-0827
.

In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate contributions be made to a charity of your choice.

 

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AZO Products launches new bladder control supplement

BY Ryan Chavis

CROMWELL, Conn. — AZO Products, a urinary and vaginal health brand for women, announced the launch of AZO Bladder Control with Go-Less. The product serves as a supplement to prescriptions and over-the-counter options and helps optimize normal bladder activity and bladder strength, the company said.

AZO Bladder Control with Go-Less contains pumpkin seed extract, which helps with maintaining bladder muscle function, along with soy isoflavones, which help maintain strong bladder muscles.

“Many women speak of being constantly confronted with their bladder issues, from getting up every hour during the night to use the bathroom, to having anxiety when leaving home because they constantly worry about finding a restroom in time,” said Nicole Bourdeau, brand manager i-Health. “As the country’s most trusted urinary health brand, we want to enable women to live more fully and are committed to providing them with a safe solution.”

The product will be in all major chains by the end of May, according to the company.

 

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Study: Aspirin increases the likelihood of pregnancy in women with recent pregnancy loss

BY Michael Johnsen

BETHESDA, Md. — A daily low dose of aspirin does not appear to prevent subsequent pregnancy loss among women with a history of one or two prior pregnancy losses, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

However, in a smaller group of women who had experienced a single recent pregnancy loss, aspirin increased the likelihood of becoming pregnant and having a live birth.

Many health care providers prescribe low dose aspirin therapy for women who have had a pregnancy loss (miscarriage or stillbirth), and who would like to get pregnant again. However, the effectiveness of this treatment has not been proven, the researchers wrote. 

In the largest study of its kind, the researchers randomly assigned more than 1,000 women with a history of pregnancy loss to either daily low dose aspirin or a placebo. The women began taking the equivalent of one low dose aspirin (81 milligrams) each day while trying to conceive. The researchers reported that, overall, there was no difference in pregnancy loss rates between the two groups.

“Our results indicate that aspirin is not effective for reducing the chances of pregnancy loss in most cases,” stated first author Enrique Schisterman, chief of the Epidemiology Branch at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the institute that led the study.  

Schisterman, added, however, that additional research was needed to investigate the finding that women who had experienced a single, recent pregnancy loss (before 4 1/2 months of pregnancy and within the past year) had an increased rate of pregnancy and live birth while on aspirin therapy.

Among this group, 78% of those who took aspirin became pregnant, compared with 66% of those who took the placebo. For this subset of women, 62% of the aspirin group and 53% of the placebo group gave birth. 

The study authors hypothesized that aspirin therapy might increase the conception rate by increasing blood flow to the uterus. The researchers called for additional research to determine if aspirin therapy might be helpful for improving fertility in other subgroups as well, such as women who can’t establish a pregnancy because the embryo fails to implant in the uterus.

The findings appear in The Lancet.

For the total number of women in the study, 13% of women who took aspirin and became pregnant subsequently experienced another loss, compared with 12% who took the placebo.  Ultimately, 58% of women taking aspirin and 53% of the placebo group got pregnant and later gave birth.

 

 

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