News

Industry steps up efforts to promote heart disease awareness

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK In recognition of American Heart Month in February, retailers and manufacturers once again have stepped forward to help raise awareness that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women.

This year, the American Heart Association continued its Go Red For Women awareness campaign, a movement that aims to challenge women to know their risk for heart disease and to take action to reduce their personal risk.

Meanwhile, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute kicked off its awareness campaign, dubbed The Heart Truth, to also drive awareness and education.  

Both programs utilize the Red Dress, a symbol that NHLBI introduced in 2002 and has since become one of the most recognizable health symbols in the United States.  

According to a new survey conducted in January, the NHLBI states that 65% of women are aware that heart disease is their No. 1 killer, a slight increase from 2008. However, even though awareness is on the rise, many women do not take the message seriously or personally. One-third of women still underestimate their own personal risk of getting heart disease, and1-out-of-4 women still die from heart disease.

“Understanding your personal risk for heart disease really matters. Having just one risk factor for heart disease ‹ like high blood pressure or being overweight ‹ doubles your chance of developing heart disease,” stated Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D., director of NHLBI. “And the alarming fact is that more than 80% of midlife women have one or more of the risk factors.”

 To kick off Heart Month, Feb. 6 was “National Wear Red Day,” a national observance that encourages Americans to wear red to raise awareness. On that day, the AHA partnered with actress Andie MacDowell to help kick off a nationwide search for women to share their compelling stories at the second annual casting call at New York City’s Grand Central Terminal. Women can also submit their stories online at www.GoRedForWomen.org <http://www.GoRedForWomen.org> . On Feb. 13, the NHLBI’s The Heart Truth campaign held its sixth annual Red Dress Collection Fashion Show under the tents in New York’s Bryant Park. 

For 2009, several retailers and brands are once again supporting the movement through a series of special products and promotions. Some of the efforts include, but are not limited to: 

  • In February, CVS/pharmacy is presenting the Heart Beat Event to generate awareness on heart health and to provide solutions on how to live a heart-healthy lifestyle. As part of this 2009 campaign, CVS/pharmacy is distributing more than two million Heart Health Resource books to shoppers in more than 6,300 CVS stores. CVS/pharmacy will also offer information in circulars and advertisements, as well as on its Web site to help remind visitors that they can take action to prevent and control the risks of heart disease. 
  • During the month of February, Rite Aid is offering customers the opportunity to purchase a paper red dress with 100% of the proceeds to benefit Go Red for Women. 
  • Procter & Gamble?s Clairol Professional is donating 20 cents for every participating product sold through July 2008 to June 2009, for a total donation of $140,000. 
  • Supervalu, whose banners include Jewel-Osco, Acme and Albertsons, is a national support of the AHA?s Go Red for Women movement. 
  • General Mills’ Cheerios cereal brand has partnered with The Heart Truth, to raise awareness and provide education about the risk of heart disease in women. Cheerios created unique programs to address heart health disease awareness and, in January, unveiled new packaging that highlights the Red Dress symbol on three brands of Cheerios, including the original Yellow Box, Honey Nut, and Multi Grain.
  • Henkel’s Dial soap brand has partnered with The Heart Truth. In support of The Heart Truth and to raise awareness, Dial is launching a new red body wash with cranberry extracts and antioxidant pearls. Information about the campaign and heart health is also posted on the Dial Web site.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Americans postponing health care due to economic crunch

BY Michael Johnsen

MENLO PARK, Calif. As economic conditions continue to worsen, the public is increasingly worried about the affordability and availability of care, with many postponing or skipping treatments due to cost in the past year and a notable minority forced into serious financial straits due to medical bills, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s first health care tracking poll of 2009, released today.

In the face of the country’s current economic challenges, the public’s support for health reform remains strong and their trust in President Obama to do the right thing in health care reform is high.

Slightly more than half (53%) of Americans say their household cut back on health care due to cost concerns in the past 12 months.  The most common actions reported are relying on home remedies and over-the-counter drugs rather than visiting a doctor (35%) or skipping dental care (34%).  Roughly one in four report putting off health care they needed (27%), one in five say they have not filled a prescription (21%), and one in six (15%) say they cut pills in half or skipped doses to make their prescription last longer. “Experts and policymakers have multiple agendas in health reform, but when half the public reports skimping on care because they can’t afford it, it’s very clear that what the public wants most from health reform is relief from health care costs,” stated Kaiser president and CEO Drew Altman. 

The 27% of the public that reported they had “put off or postponed getting health care [they] needed” were asked about the specific types of care they had foregone.  The most common responses were delaying going to the doctor for a temporary illness (19%) or for preventive care (19%).  But nearly as many — 16% — report putting off care for a more serious problem, either postponing a doctor’s visit related to a chronic illness such as diabetes or delaying major or minor surgery. 

Not all medical care can be postponed, however, and the survey indicates that roughly one in five (19%) people experienced serious financial problems recently due to family medical bills. Specifically, 13% reported they have used up all or most of their savings trying to pay off high medical bills in the past 12 months, and just as many say their medical debt means they have difficulty paying other bills. A similar proportion (12%) say they have been contacted by a collection agency, while a smaller share (7%) report being unable to pay for basic necessities like food, heat or housing. 

Beyond actual financial hardship due to medical care, the survey also indicates a rise in worries associated with health care costs.  Nearly half of Americans (45%) report they are “very” worried about having to pay more for their health care or health insurance, the highest proportion measured in Kaiser polls since late 2006.  Roughly four in 10 (38%) are very worried about affording health care they need — a number that rises to 56% among those who believe someone in their household will lose a job this year. 

Fully one-third (34%) of those with health coverage are worried they will lose it.  While these concerns are prevalent among low-income Americans, one-third of households earning between $30,000 and $75,000 per year are also “very worried” about losing their health care benefits. 

The share of Americans who say that the country’s economic problems make it more important than ever to take on health care reform has remained remarkably stable over the past five months at roughly six in 10 (62%).  However, the partisan divide also remains large with Democrats overwhelmingly (79%) saying reform is more important than ever and most Republicans (58%) saying the nation cannot afford to tackle health care reform at this point.  Independents tilt the balance by being in favor of reform now (57%). 

Health care continues to rank as one of the top issues on the nation’s policy agenda.  The economy dominates (71%) the public’s priorities for the president and Congress, followed by making Medicare and Social Security more financially sound (49%) — a new issue added to the list this month.  Terrorism (42%) and health care (39%) rank third and fourth. 

Interestingly, while the majority of Americans view action on health reform as more important than ever and believe reform would be good for the country as a whole (59%), fewer think it would personally benefit them or their family (39%).  A plurality (43%) of Americans do not expect to be personally impacted by reform and a small minority (11%) think they would be worse off.

“Far more people see themselves directly benefiting from health reform and far fewer see themselves being negatively affected than we saw in the Clinton health reform debate. Today’s economic anxieties have created a better starting point for health reform than we saw last time around,” Altman said.

While health reform remains popular, the public has high expectations for how easily reform might be achieved. A majority (58%) of Americans say that if policymakers made the right changes, they could reform health care “without spending more money to do it.”  This majority view is shared across political party identification, age group and income level.  A majority (56%) of the public also believes that the health system can be reformed “without changing the existing health care arrangements of people like yourself.” 

Seven in 10 Americans (72%) have a “great deal” or “fair amount” of trust in President Obama “to do or recommend the right thing for health care reform,” giving him a 12 percentage point lead over the next most trusted actor in health care reform. Following Obama on the list of trusted players are doctors’ organizations (60%), Democratic leaders in Congress (57%) and AARP (57%). When Americans hear policymakers talk about health care reform, they predominantly are thinking about cost and coverage.  When asked what “health care reform” means to them, 40% of the public respond with a cost concern – people paying less for care, care being more affordable, or lowering the prices of medical goods such as prescription drugs.  Just as many (39%) describe reform as providing insurance to more people or helping the uninsured. Quality or delivery system reform did not leap to the minds of Americans with only nine percent mentioning it in their responses.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Wegmans launches program to lower cost of generics

BY Michael Johnsen

ROCHESTER, N.Y. Wegmans on Wednesday announced a new program that will lower the cost of nearly 390 select generic maintenance drugs and those used to treat acute conditions. The list is made up of the most-commonly prescribed generic prescription drugs filled at Wegmans, the retailer stated.

“We started by lowering food prices in November, and then began to look at other ways we could lower costs for customers and employees,” stated Colleen Wegman, Wegman’s president. “Free antibiotic prescriptions followed in early January,” she said. “It has confirmed what we’ve always known. If we approach everything by doing what’s right for our employees and customers, it is also good for our business.”

But more than saving money for its customers, expanding prescription savings programs in this economy prevents pharmacy share erosion.

“When a patient feels they must shop around for lower prices, we risk sacrificing the data that shows all of the prescribed drugs for that person,” stated John Carlo, Wegmans’ VP pharmacy. “It’s vital that we have a complete patient profile for every customer in order to identify drug interactions. We don’t want to give our patients a reason to use another pharmacy.”

The most-significant savings from this program will go to the people who need it most:  the uninsured who pay cash for prescriptions; those who have experienced a change in health care coverage; and the unemployed or uninsured who may not be filling their prescriptions. Consumers with prescription insurance coverage will see an immediate reduction in the amount of their co-pay.

Wegmans expects this to impact approximately 3.6 million new and refilled prescriptions annually. The total estimated savings for employees, customers, insurers, self-insured employer groups, and federal and state programs, like Medicare, Medicaid or EPIC in New York State, will exceed $15 million, according to the company. “It was stunning to realize the impact this program alone will have on health care costs in the communities where we have stores,” Wegman said.

The new prices go into effect March 1. A 30-day supply of the listed drugs will now cost $4.00.  A 90-day supply will cost $10.  The complete list will be available on wegmans.com.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?