PHARMACY

IAF: 10 U.S. states will see highest diabetes prevalence, cost

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON — A new study conducted by the Institute for Alternative Futures and funded by Novo Nordisk highlighted the top 10 U.S. states that are labeled as "diabetes hot spots" and are projected to carry the brunt of the epidemic over the next 15 years.

The IAF diabetes model projected that the overall number of people in the United States living with diabetes will increase 64% by 2025 to 53.1 million, or 1-in-7 Americans. In turn, the medical and societal cost of diabetes will be almost $514 billion, a 72% increase from 2010, IAF said. Breaking down the statistics, IAF projected the following states will carry the biggest diabetes burden:

  1. California: Projected cost of $63.63 billion, 6.6 million people with diabetes;

  2. Texas: Projected cost of $52.17 billion; 5.5 million people with diabetes;

  3. Florida: Projected cost of $40.43 billion; 4.2 million people with diabetes;

  4. New York: Projected cost of $28.38 billion; 2.9 million people with diabetes;

  5. Ohio: Projected cost of $19.76 billion; 2.1 million people with diabetes;

  6. Illinois: Projected cost of $19.67 billion; 2 million people with diabetes;

  7. Georgia: Projected cost of $19.54 billion; 2 million people with diabetes;

  8. Pennsylvania: Projected cost of $18.37 billion; 1.9 million people with diabetes;

  9. North Carolina: Projected cost of $17.91 billion; 1.9 million people with diabetes; and

  10. Michigan: Projected cost of $15.85 billion; 1.6 million people with diabetes.

Currently the 10 states carry nearly 60% of diabetes-related costs.

The IAF study was based on available national diabetes data, including the recent CDC projections to 2050, as well as population projections.

"This research maps the alarming demographic realities of diabetes through 2025 if we don’t make fundamental changes, particularly in our lifestyles and health system," said William Robert Rowley, senior fellow at the Institute for Alternative Futures and lead author of the study. "The burden of diabetes will not fall equally. To change this tragic trajectory, it is imperative that public and private agencies work together on national, as well as state and local levels."

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Late-stage trial to commence for AstraZeneca’s opioid-induced constipation treatment

BY Alaric DeArment

WILMINGTON, Del. — Anglo-Swedish drug maker AstraZeneca has enrolled the first patient in a late-stage clinical trial for a drug to treat constipation related to use of opioid painkillers, the company said.

The phase-3 trial will investigate the safety and efficacy of NKTR-118 as a treatment for opioid-induced constipation. It will consist of two 12-week placebo-controlled studies with about 630 patients each, and a long-term safety study that will include patients from the efficacy studies, as well as new patients. AstraZeneca is developing the drug under a license agreement with Nektar Therapeutics.

“This is a key milestone for NKTR-118,” AstraZeneca EVP global medicines development Anders Ekblom said. “We will put our knowledge and our effort into studying NKTR-118 as a potential new treatment option for opioid-induced constipation, which continues to be an area of unmet need in patients needing effective pain treatment.”

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Amylin, Takeda suspend obesity drug trial

BY Alaric DeArment

SAN DIEGO — Amylin Pharmaceuticals and Takeda Pharmaceutical have suspended a mid-stage trial of an obesity drug over safety concerns, the two said Wednesday.

The drug makers stopped the phase-2 trial of a combination of pramlintide and metreleptin due to problems that arose in two patients related to metreleptin. Amylin said the decision to suspend the trial did not affect its investigations of metreleptin as a treatment of diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia in patients with lipodystrophy.

“The safety of patients in our clinical programs is of paramount concern to the companies,” Amylin SVP and chief medical officer Orville Kolterman said. “We have taken this precaution so that we can thoroughly investigate this finding.”

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