HEALTH

Hyland’s gets ‘Wild’

BY Michael Johnsen

LOS ANGELES Hyland’s on Thursday announced that it has signed an agreement with Wild Child, a Western Australia-based natural healthcare products company, for exclusive North American use of the Wild Child brand, and distribution of its pediculicide brands Quit Nits kit and Quit Nits preventative spray.

“At Hyland’s, we are committed to providing our consumers and their families with the safest, most effective natural health care products possible,” stated J.P. Borneman, Hyland’s chairman and CEO. “This partnership with Wild Child, a company that shares our vision, expands our offerings to now include a natural solution to a very common childhood condition, head lice.”

The Quit Nits offerings will retain the Wild Child branding, though the Hyland’s oval will be added to the distribution section of the drug facts label, a factor that should help bring loyal Hyland’s users to the brand. Quit Nits is currently distributed through more than 6,500 retail doors and additional distribution is pending, Borneman told Drug Store News.

“We are very pleased to be working with [Wild Child founder] Leanne Preston and Wild Child director and pharmaceutical chemist, John Found,” Borneman said. “We believe this is just the beginning of a long-term partnership that will benefit both of our companies and more importantly, our consumers.”

The two greatest synergies realized from this pairing will be distribution and marketing, Borneman noted. Quit Nits will now be offered as part of Hyland’s extensive portfolio of homeopathic remedies, he said. Similarly, Hyland’s will include Quit Nits in its marketing spend.

The Quit Nits kit contains two tubes of advance lice treatment cream and one everyday preventative spray. The advance lice treatment cream eliminates head lice and their eggs, or nits, in two easy steps.

And the Quit Nits everyday preventative spray is a topical spray that prevents lice infestation both prior to exposure as a proactive measure and after infestation to avoid reoccurrence.

Both products are formulated with certified natural active ingredients originating in the Australian outback, with no chemical pesticides. Traditional over-the-counter medicines for head lice include chemical insecticides that kill lice but are not able to kill their nits, which then require an additional tedious comb-out process.

According to a 2000 Lancet article, there is estimated between 6 million and 12 million cases of head lice annually in the United States. Of these, the highest prevalence is among pre-school and elementary school children, ages 3 to 12 years.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Ganeden Biotech announces partnership with National Farmers Organization

BY Allison Cerra

CLEVELAND The maker of a patented probiotic strain announced a new partnership agreement with the National Farmers Organization to create awareness of the health benefits of probiotics, and increase the availability of probiotic-enhanced milk.

Ganeden Biotech said the partnership gives the NFO access to the premier probiotic GanedenBC30, offering processors the opportunity to provide probiotic-enhanced milk products to consumers. Ganeden Biotech will serve as the organization’s sole probiotic provider.

“We are thrilled to be able to provide the health benefits of probiotic-enhanced milk to consumers, while also providing another stream of revenue for our nation’s family dairy farmers,” said Bradley Rach, NFO national dairy director. “The quality of Ganeden Biotech’s probiotic strain, GanedenBC30, coupled with the caliber of the company’s scientific operations made it the ideal partner for our organization.”

“Partnering with the National Farmers Organization will allow us to provide more consumers with access to probiotic-enhanced milk products, while simultaneously supporting family farmers,” said Ganeden Biotech CEO Andrew Lefkowitz. “We are proud to partner with the NFO in this endeavor and help support our country’s farms.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

New findings conclude U.S. children may lack healthy level of vitamin D

BY Michael Johnsen

BOSTON As many as 20% of children in the United States between the ages of 1 and 11 years may suffer from suboptimal levels of vitamin D, according to a large nationally representative study published in the November issue of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Boston announced Monday.

The study, led by Jonathan Mansbach of Children’s Hospital Boston, is the most up-to-date analysis of vitamin D levels in U.S. children. It builds on the growing evidence that levels have fallen below what’s considered healthy, and that black and Hispanic children are at particularly high risk.

Both the optimal amount of vitamin D supplementation and the healthy blood level of vitamin D are under heated debate in the medical community, the hospital suggested. Mansbach and collaborators from the University of Colorado Denver and Massachusetts General Hospital used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to look at vitamin D levels in a nationally representative sample of roughly 5,000 children from 2001-2006. Extrapolating to the entire U.S. population, their analysis suggests that roughly 20% of all children fell below the recommended 50 nmol/L. Moreover, more than two-thirds of all children had vitamin D levels below 75 nmol/L, including 80% of Hispanic children and 92% of non-Hispanic black children.

“If 75 nmol/L or higher is eventually demonstrated to be the healthy normal level of vitamin D, then there is much more vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. than people realize,” Mansbach said.

In the study, children taking multi-vitamins that included vitamin D had higher levels overall, but this accounted for less than half of all children. Mansbach recommended that all children take vitamin D supplements, especially those living in high latitudes, where the sun is scarce in the wintertime.

“We need to perform randomized controlled trials to understand if vitamin D actually improves these wide-ranging health outcomes,” Mansbach said. “At present, however, there are a lot of studies demonstrating associations between low levels of vitamin D and poor health. Therefore, we believe many U.S. children would likely benefit from more vitamin D.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?