HEALTH

Honey Naturals presents kids’ cough syrup at ECRM Cough, Cold and Allergy

BY Michael Johnsen

SALT LAKE CITY Honey Naturals will be promoting its children’s cough syrup at the ECRM Cough, Cold and Allergy event in Jacksonville, Fla. next week, the company announced Wednesday.

The company’s new product, ZarBee’s Children’s Cough Syrup, is an all-natural, honey-based cough suppressant that provides children relief from coughs while simultaneously boosting the immune system.

“As a pediatrician, I found it extremely frustrating that I was unable to offer any help to my young patients to find relief from their coughs,” stated Zak Zarbock, a practicing pediatrician and developer of the cough syrup.

According to a recent Penn State research trial cited by Honey Naturals, dark honey has been proven to be safer and more effective than Dextromethorphan, the active ingredient in many cough medicines. ZarBee’s Cough Syrup uses a unique blend of dark honey known to be higher in antioxidants than traditional clover honey. The syrup also contains a child’s recommended daily serving of vitamin C and zinc gluconate.

Honey Naturals is looking to expand upon the regional sales success of its ZarBee’s products in the Mountain West and is planning to secure national distribution with one or more retail chains with a nationwide presence.

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Home Diagnostics appoints Joseph Capper president, CEO and director

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. Home Diagnostics, Inc. on Monday appointed Joseph Capper as lead executive of the diabetes diagnostics companies. Capper was named president, CEO and director.

Capper succeeds J. Richard Damron, Jr., who served in the same capacity since 2001 and will be departing the company.

“On behalf of the board, I would like to thank [Damron] for his commitment and assistance during this transition period,” stated George Holley, HDI chairman. “We extend our best wishes to him and appreciate the leadership he provided to Home Diagnostics during the last eight years, which includes the company’s successful public offering.”

“I am pleased to appoint Joe Capper to the positions of CEO and president of Home Diagnostics and welcome him to the board,” Holley added. “[Capper] garnered extensive experience in the diabetes industry during his tenure at Bayer and CCS Medical, and has an understanding of our distribution channels as well as operations and supply chain management. [Capper] is the ideal leader to join our existing strong management team in order to move Home Diagnostics to the next stage of growth by maximizing our current product expansion and capitalizing on the strength of our distribution network.”

“I have been familiar with Home Diagnostics as a business partner for many years and look forward to leveraging my experience in the field to help accelerate the growth and expansion of our business,” Capper said. “I have great respect for the company’s ability to innovate, the product portfolio and the market position they have achieved in the industry. I am extremely excited about the opportunity to join the Home Diagnostics team and look forward to capitalizing on our strong product line and market position.”

Capper most recently was president and CEO of CCS Medical, a medical supply management company, from 2003 to 2008. Under his leadership, CCS Medical’s annual sales grew from approximately $60 million to over $500 million. Additionally, he was responsible for acquiring and integrating Becton Dickenson’s blood glucose monitoring division into the CCS product line and commercializing it under the Nova Max brand.

Prior to joining CCS, Capper worked with Bayer Healthcare’s diabetes care division, where he served as the division’s national sales director. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from West Chester University and an MBA in International Finance from George Washington University.

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CDC warns pregnant women of potential infections

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday posted a number of potential infections around which women who are pregnant or who are planning to become pregnant ought to be aware, including measures those women can take in an effort to avoid any complications.

For example, CDC noted that group B strep, also known as GBS, can be very dangerous for a newborn and that pregnant women ought to be tested for GBS between weeks 35 and 37. About a quarter of all women carry the bacteria that cause GBS infection, the CDC noted. GBS bacteria are usually not harmful to women but babies can get very sick and even die if their mothers pass GBS bacteria to them during childbirth.

For women with GBS, doctors can typically prescribe an antibiotic, usually penicillin, during labor that will prevent the bacteria from spreading to the baby.

Other concerns include the cytomegalovirus, which can lead to birth defects or other serious problems ? even death. The risk of getting CMV through casual contact is very small. Usually the virus is passed from infected people to others through direct contact with body fluids. Practicing good hygiene can reduce the chance of CMV infection while pregnant, the CDC noted.

A third concern for pregnant moms is listeriosis. Pregnant women are about 20 times more likely than other healthy adults to get listeriosis, a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with Listeria bacteria. It mostly affects pregnant women, newborns, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. About one-third of listeriosis cases happen during pregnancy.

Infected pregnant women may experience a mild, flu-like illness. Listeriosis during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery or infection in newborns.

In general, women can protect themselves from listeriosis by eating foods that are thoroughly cleaned and cooked. Pregnant women and others who are especially susceptible to the disease should take extra precautions.

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