HEALTH

Honey Naturals presents kids’ cough syrup at ECRM Cough, Cold and Allergy

BY Michael Johnsen

SALT LAKE CITY Honey Naturals will be promoting its children’s cough syrup at the ECRM Cough, Cold and Allergy event in Jacksonville, Fla. next week, the company announced Wednesday.

The company’s new product, ZarBee’s Children’s Cough Syrup, is an all-natural, honey-based cough suppressant that provides children relief from coughs while simultaneously boosting the immune system.

“As a pediatrician, I found it extremely frustrating that I was unable to offer any help to my young patients to find relief from their coughs,” stated Zak Zarbock, a practicing pediatrician and developer of the cough syrup.

According to a recent Penn State research trial cited by Honey Naturals, dark honey has been proven to be safer and more effective than Dextromethorphan, the active ingredient in many cough medicines. ZarBee’s Cough Syrup uses a unique blend of dark honey known to be higher in antioxidants than traditional clover honey. The syrup also contains a child’s recommended daily serving of vitamin C and zinc gluconate.

Honey Naturals is looking to expand upon the regional sales success of its ZarBee’s products in the Mountain West and is planning to secure national distribution with one or more retail chains with a nationwide presence.

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Lilly U.S.A. hires singer Angie Stone to promote diabetes awareness

BY Alaric DeArment

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. A drug maker is sponsoring an initiative to raise awareness of diabetes among African-Americans and has hired a Grammy-nominated singer to help promote it.

Lilly U.S.A., a subsidiary of Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly & Co., has enlisted Angie Stone to go to Birmingham, Ala., to help promote the Fearless African-Americans Connected and Empowered Diabetes initiative and encourage those living with diabetes to take control of their disease, Lilly announced Monday. 

The event will take place Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the More Than Conquerer Faith Church, at 1327 Dennison Ave., Birmingham, AL 35211. The free event will feature “Diabetes 101” educational materials and access to certified diabetes educators who can answer questions about management of the disease, and interactive experiential zone featuring resources from supporting community health organizations and a first-hand testimonial from Stone about her experience managing diabetes, as well as live performances of songs from her latest album. 

Stone has been traveling to cities around the country since 2007 as the national spokeswoman for the F.A.C.E. Diabetes initiative. 

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CDC warns pregnant women of potential infections

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday posted a number of potential infections around which women who are pregnant or who are planning to become pregnant ought to be aware, including measures those women can take in an effort to avoid any complications.

For example, CDC noted that group B strep, also known as GBS, can be very dangerous for a newborn and that pregnant women ought to be tested for GBS between weeks 35 and 37. About a quarter of all women carry the bacteria that cause GBS infection, the CDC noted. GBS bacteria are usually not harmful to women but babies can get very sick and even die if their mothers pass GBS bacteria to them during childbirth.

For women with GBS, doctors can typically prescribe an antibiotic, usually penicillin, during labor that will prevent the bacteria from spreading to the baby.

Other concerns include the cytomegalovirus, which can lead to birth defects or other serious problems ? even death. The risk of getting CMV through casual contact is very small. Usually the virus is passed from infected people to others through direct contact with body fluids. Practicing good hygiene can reduce the chance of CMV infection while pregnant, the CDC noted.

A third concern for pregnant moms is listeriosis. Pregnant women are about 20 times more likely than other healthy adults to get listeriosis, a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with Listeria bacteria. It mostly affects pregnant women, newborns, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. About one-third of listeriosis cases happen during pregnancy.

Infected pregnant women may experience a mild, flu-like illness. Listeriosis during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery or infection in newborns.

In general, women can protect themselves from listeriosis by eating foods that are thoroughly cleaned and cooked. Pregnant women and others who are especially susceptible to the disease should take extra precautions.

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