PHARMACY

Health Mart: Putting the pestle where the mortar is, the franchiser is benchmarking community pharmacy success

BY Michael Johnsen

McKesson’s Health Mart pharmacy franchisees recently gained access to a tool that has the potential of giving community pharmacy a leg up on the competition in the coming years. EQuIPP, from Pharmacy Quality Solutions, does just that — equips independents with individual store data that marks the performance of their pharmacy vs. a national benchmark. 

It’s putting the pestle where the mortar is — retail pharmacy has the patient touchpoints and data-tracking wherewithal to make a material impact on patient outcomes. Important, because that’s what the new year will bring — more and more healthcare payers looking to improve their own patient outcomes. And what better way to do it than to partner with outperforming pharmacies?

It’s a message that’s reverberating throughout the industry. Community pharmacy has constructed the most efficient pathways to less costly modes of care. They do it through medication therapy management programs, medication adherence programs and medication reconciliation when patients are discharged from the hospital. For preventive care and wellness, pharmacies are one of the fastest-growing destinations for vaccinations as well as for disease-state screening services and retail clinics.

And across a sector of the industry where the patient and pharmacist are often on a first-name basis, community pharmacists won’t only be able to surmise their personal relationships help improve patient outcomes on a pharmacy-wide scale, they’ll be able to demonstrate what that personal touch can do through empirical data. The proof will be in the actual outcomes. 

"This is a critical time for retail pharmacies to leverage their role as healthcare service providers, and we believe the pharmacies that will stay competitive will consistently deliver clinical interactions that improve patient health while managing costs," Health Mart president Stephen Courtman shared with DSN in an exclusive interview this summer. 

This past summer’s McKesson IdeaShare featured an entire pavilion of nothing but compliance-improving solutions. Solutions extended from vaccination programs to adherence training and behavior coaching, refill reminders, medication synchronization and compliance packaging. 

"Whether we look at it as an opportunity or a challenge, the growing movement to accountable care and performance-based networks will likely be the major focus over the coming year," Courtman said. "As payers transition from transaction-based reimbursement, their expectations also are shifting to focus on outcomes and results. In order to control the cost of care, payers will control where they send their ‘lives.’"

And now Health Mart operators have one more tool to help direct those lives through their doors. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New study strengthens case for pharmacists’ role in improving adherence

BY Alaric DeArment

A study conducted among rural patients at Thrifty White Pharmacy locations in the Midwest and published in the November/December issue of the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association found that patients who received appointment-based medication synchronization were up to six times more likely to adhere to their therapies than those who didn’t receive them.

Over the years, study after study has shown that pharmacists can play a crucial role in ensuring that patients take their drugs when they’re supposed to and as instructed. And poor medication adherence is no small issue, as studies have shown it costs the country nearly $300 billion per year, in addition to contributing to poor health outcomes. It’s been said that improvements in medication adherence can be the equivalent of a blockbuster drug, and according to the National Coalition on Health Care, self-management of chronic diseases could save $10 for every $1 spent.

Many retail pharmacy chains have already been recognized for their efforts to improve medication adherence through medication synchronization, medication therapy management and programs that keep track on patients’ medication use after they’ve been discharged from the hospital, as well as being tapped for participation in adherence-based programs. For example, Miami-based Navarro Discount Pharmacy was selected last month by OutcomesMTM as one of the four pharmacies in the Southeast recognized for its commitment to MTM, while Walgreens’ WellTransitions program received an endorsement in September from the American Hospital Association.

The ability of such services as MTM to improve adherence is strong enough that pharmacy retailers have taken their message to Capitol Hill as well. In October, the National Association of Chain Drug Stores sent a statement to budget committee conference members in the House and Senate touting the ability of MTM to improve adherence and lower costs, citing reports by the Congressional Budget Office and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Such findings have helped drive support for bipartisan bills in the House and Senate, each titled the Medication Therapy Management Empowerment Act of 2013.

 

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FDA approves first drug for Peyronie’s disease

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. — The Food and Drug Administration has approved a treatment for a sexual deformity that affects men.

The FDA announced the approval of Auxilium Pharmaceuticals’ Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum), the first drug treatment for Peyronie’s disease. Peyronie’s disease results from a lump of scar tissue in the penis that causes a curvature of at least 30 degrees during erection, which can make sexual intercourse difficult. Xiaflex received FDA approval in 2010 for Dupuytren’s contractor, a progressive hand disease that can affect a person’s ability to straighten and properly use their fingers.

"Today’s approval expands the available treatment options for men experiencing Peyronie’s disease and enables them, in consultation with their doctor, to choose the most appropriate treatment option," FDA Division of Bone, Reproductive and Urologic Products deputy director Audrey Gassman said.

 

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