PHARMACY

Health Mart expands health screenings for the 2014 Health Mart Healthy Living Tour

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — Health Mart, a franchise of more than 3,200 independently owned pharmacies across all 50 states, on Thursday kicked off the 2014 Health Mart Healthy Living Tour at Pharmacy Development Service’s Independent Pharmacy Business Growth Conference in Orlando, Fla. The nationwide tour features a mobile screening vehicle that will visit more than 130 communities across the U.S. to provide health education and free health screenings.

Sponsored by Health Mart Pharmacy, the 2014 Health Mart Healthy Living Tour aims to help identify people at risk for a variety of health conditions that can be better managed with the help of a pharmacist. This year’s tour will go beyond the traditional focus on diabetes to include screenings for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity. Tour attendees are encouraged to engage with their local Health Mart pharmacists on healthcare-related topics and partner for better health. While on tour, Health Mart will award ten pharmacists the “Health Mart Community Care Excellence Award” for providing exemplary care and services that add measurable value to patient healthcare and community wellness.

“Community pharmacists play an important role in their local area by providing broader access to clinical services and medication counseling, which can help patients better manage a variety of health conditions,” stated Steve Courtman, president, Health Mart. “Health Mart is committed to improving patient care and outcomes, and the Health Mart Healthy Living Tour expands the ability of Health Mart pharmacists to work closely with their patients as an integral member of the healthcare team.”

 

 

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NACDS Foundation announces the establishment of the Anthony N. Civello Pharmacy Scholarship

BY Antoinette Alexander

ARLINGTON, Va. — In recognition of a career dedicated to the advancement of public health, the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation has announced a gift of $50,000 to the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy to establish the Anthony N. Civello Pharmacy Scholarship.

Civello, who serves as chairman, president and CEO of Kerr Drug, has been a leader in the pharmacy and chain drug industry for nearly five decades. He joined the NACDS board in 1998 and served as chairman from 2005 to 2007. He also served on the NACDS Foundation board from 2003 to 2013.

This gift to the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy honors Civello’s leadership and commitment to the NACDS Foundation. It is the Foundation’s hope that this fund will help support promising students engaged in meaningful patient-care research.

The Foundation stated that Civello was instrumental in realigning the its vision and mission to focus on evidence-based research that advances public health.  Since 2010, the NACDS Foundation has invested more than $3 million into research initiatives with partners such as Harvard University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Nebraska Medical Center, among many others.  
 
“We are pleased to recognize Tony’s vision for the advancement of public health through this scholarship gift.  There is no finer person and no finer leader worthy of this honor,” stated NACDS Foundation chairman Steve Anderson.  “I read somewhere that people should strive not only to be successful, but to be ‘people of value.’  Tony Civello has been both.  However I would like to edit that to read that people like Tony are people with values – with an ‘s’ – whose character is of the highest integrity.”

Dean Patricia Kroboth of the University of Pittsburgh remembers conversations with Tony Civello that date back to the early 1990s. “Tony has long had the vision of pharmacists as health care providers; through his endeavors, he has changed the face of community pharmacy. We are proud to call him a Distinguished Alumnus of our School of Pharmacy and Legacy Laureate of the University and are thrilled to connect our community-research focused student pharmacists to Tony Civello’s legacy through the scholarship that carries his name.”

“I am deeply honored to receive this scholarship designation. This is an important opportunity to serve both the mission of the NACDS’ Foundation, and give back to my alma mater in helping pharmacy students engage in meaningful research focusing on patient-centered care,” Civello stated.

 

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Study: High blood-pressure meds associated with increased injury risk from a fall in elderly patients

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO — Medication to treat high blood pressure in older patients appears to be associated with an increased risk for serious injury from falling such as a hip fracture or head injury, especially in older patients who have been injured in previous falls, the JAMA Network Journals reported Monday. 

Most people older than 70 years have high blood pressure, and blood pressure control is key to reducing risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Previous research has suggested that blood pressure medications may increase risk of falls and fall injuries.

Researchers examined the association between BP medication use and experiencing a serious injury from a fall in 4,961 patients older than 70 years with hypertension. Among the patients, 14.1% took no antihypertensive medications, 54.6% had moderate exposure to BP medications and 31.3% had high exposure.

During a three-year follow-up, 446 patients (9%) experienced serious injuries from falls. The risk for serious injuries from falls was higher for patients who used antihypertensive medication than for nonusers and even higher for patients who had had a previous fall injury.

"Although cause and effect cannot be established in this observational study and we cannot exclude confounding, antihypertensive medications seemed to be associated with an increased risk of serious fall injury compared with no antihypertensive use in this nationally representative cohort of older adults, particularly among participants with a previous fall injury," wrote Mary Tinetti of the Yale School of Medicine. "The potential harms vs. benefits of antihypertensive medications should be weighed in deciding whether to continue antihypertensives in older adults with multiple chronic conditions."

 

 

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