HEALTH

HBI introduces DreamKeeper 400 for insomnia

BY Michael Johnsen

FREMONT, Calif. HBI USA on Wednesday announced the launch of its insomnia device DreamKeeper 400, which uses its proprietary breath synchronization program and parallelized electroStatic field technology to rebuild the user’s biological clock and improve the quality and duration of sleep.

According to clinical trials conducted by the company, 70 percent of users reported improvements in sleep duration and quality within three weeks of using the device.

Users position the DreamKeeper on the inner wrist a half-hour prior to going to bed for a period of approximately three weeks. The breath synchronization program guides users to slow down their breathing, to calm them down and prepare for sleep.

Suggested retail for the DreamKeeper 400 is $149.99, and is currently available online through Target and Amazon.com.

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CRN study finds that nearly four-fifths of doctors recommend supplements

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The majority of physicians—79 percent—recommend supplements to their patients, according to the “Life…supplemented” Healthcare Professionals Impact Study, conducted by the Council for Responsible Nutrition, that was released Wednesday.

Bone health was the leading health reason physicians recommend supplements—33 percent of physicians recommended bone health supplements to their patients—followed by supplements for overall health, joint health, heart health and to maintain a healthy cholesterol.

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Congressman recognized for stand against organized retail crime

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Coalition Against Organized Retail Crime on Wednesday commended Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security for holding a hearing devoted to tackling organized retail crime.

The hearing is scheduled to take place Sept. 22.

Organized retail crime involves sophisticated crime rings that steal and stockpile huge quantities of merchandise that they then sell often to unwitting buyers. ORC gangs target high value consumer goods such as power tools, razors, over-the-counter medicines, items that are in high demand and are often easily concealable. The stolen merchandise is then sold through flea markets, swap meets, pawn shops and increasingly through internet auction sites.

Merchandise, such as baby formula and diabetic test strips, which can be damaged if not stored at proper temperatures, are often mishandled after being stolen, the coalition noted.

“With the recent introduction of three bills, Congress has taken a strong step forward to protect consumers and demonstrate their commitment to addressing organized retail crime,” the coalition stated.

In July Reps. Brad Ellsworth, D-Ind., and Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, introduced the Organized Retail Crime Act of 2008 (HR 6491). The bill would amend federal criminal code, making it illegal to engage in activities that further organized retail crime.

Soon after Scott introduced the E-Fencing Enforcement Act of 2008 (HR 6713), which addresses the selling of stolen goods online.

In the Senate, S. 3434, the Combating Organized Retail Crime Act of 2008, was introduced by Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill. The Durbin bill would clarify existing law to give law enforcement the tools to prosecute ORC, require online and offline marketplaces to investigate suspicious sales, and place basic disclosure requirements on online marketplaces.

The Coalition Against Organized Retail Crime, formed in 2001, is composed of 33 national manufacturing and retail organizations as well as individual companies that have come together to fight a new type of retail crime.

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