HEALTH

Hartman Group breaks down health and wellness consumer segments

BY Michael Johnsen

BELLEVUE, Wash. — Consumers think, live and shop differently depending on where they are within the “World” of Health and Wellness, according to the Hartman Group report "Health + Wellness: A Culture of Wellness," released in December. More than consumer segmentation, the Hartman Group’s World model accounts for consumer engagement with the institutions comprising wellness culture and serves not only as a helpful way of recognizing how consumers may differ from each other, but also as model of cultural change and the emergence and adoption of new health and wellness trends. 

All consumers participate in the World of health and wellness, behaviorally and aspirationally, the report noted. “Core” consumers comprise the smallest segment (13% of adults). They are the early adopters, trendsetters, evangelists. In 2013, they described health and wellness as proactive and mindful in body, mind and soul. They privilege authenticity, sustainability, quality and knowledge and often serve as the source of this knowledge as they navigate retail and other sites of health and wellness decision making.

“Inner” and “outer” mid-level consumers together account for a majority (62%) of adults. They are not as intensely committed as core consumers but are essential to the success of any “trend” – selecting, translating and adopting new ideas launched from the core. As of 2013, they have solidly embraced ideas of health and wellness that integrate mind and body, self and community. The most involved of them have an eye on authenticity and ground their purchase decisions in a bank of knowledge, while those less involved are glad to rely on experts.

What the Hartman Group identified as periphery consumers (25%) understand that they should eat right and exercise, and even if they don’t act on these consistently, in 2013 they aspire to manage their health proactively, with a goal of happiness rather than simply freedom from illness. They turn to brands for perceived quality and consistency, and they may bow to price and convenience more than core or mid-level consumers.

But today all segments for the first time share in a broadened, personal, proactive wellness perspective, the Hartman Group noted. 

"Over the past decade, we have observed a shift away from a perfunctory, ascetic, reactive and compliant notion of wellness to one that is more experiential, positive, holistic, proactive and self-assessed," the Hartman Group released as part of its executive summary of the report. "There has been a cultural shift — now complete for all intents and purposes — from ‘health’ to ‘quality of life;’ from reactive health to proactive wellness."

Increased reliance in 2010 on discount, dollar and grocery at the expense of more specialized health and wellness channels has subsided as consumers return some of their business to specialty in 2013, the Hartman Group noted. At the same time, products offering wellness distinctions (such as natural or organic) have become so ubiquitous that alternative/specialty channels will need to offer more to maintain their appeal.

Within health management, weight is still top-of-mind but no longer as central to consumer practice and urgency. Conditions whose presence is often assessed via self-diagnosis (especially relating to digestion and energy) have gained salience. What consumers look for in themselves is often conditioned by what they see in others. Because diabetes has gained exposure across social networks, engagement in diabetes prevention has extended to younger consumers. And consumers continue to seek food-based approaches to getting the appropriate vitamins and nutrients in their diets, the Hartman Group report noted.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Merck explores sale of animal health, consumer care divisions

BY Michael Johnsen

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. — Merck on Monday reported on its intent to explore strategic options for its animal health and consumer care businesses. The company expects to complete the process and take action, if any, in 2014. 

Exploring strategic options for its animal health and consumer care businesses to determine the most value-creating option for each and could reach different decisions about the two businesses, Merck stated. 

Over the last four months of 2013, the company announced plans to close or sell manufacturing operations at Swords, Ireland; La Vallée, France; Arecibo and Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; and completed the sale of its active pharmaceutical ingredient operations at Oss, the Netherlands; and announced closure of the Summit, N.J. site.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Alere Wellbeing publishes book touting Quit For Life smoking-cessation program

BY Michael Johnsen

SEATTLE — After years of successfully helping tobacco users quit with the Quit For Life Program, Alere Wellbeing has launched a new book designed to bring that expertise to the everyday consumer. Anyone wanting to quit tobacco can now purchase a copy of Quit Smoking for Life, written by health writer Suzanne Schlosberg with the help of Quit Coaches from the program.

Within the pages of this book, tobacco users will find a five-step plan that makes quitting achievable for everyone. With Quit Smoking for Life, smokers will map out every aspect of their quit — the date they will stop smoking; how they’ll occupy their hands, mouth and mind; and how they will cope with stress, nicotine cravings and being around smokers. Preparation is the crucial step, yet most smokers just wing it — and fail, Alere stated.

In fact, just 4% to 7% of tobacco users who try to quit on their own have success, though 69% of smokers say they want to quit.

The Quit Smoking for Life plan involves strategies such as “mini-quits,” tobacco proofing and nicotine replacement medications, which are often used incorrectly, according to Alere Wellbeing. It includes a pull-out workbook, as well as quitting stories from people who have beat nicotine addictions and lots of realistic, supportive tips from professional quit coaches.

The Quit For Life Program, backed by the American Cancer Society, has an average quit rate of 47%. However, many people do not have access to the Quit For Life Program, as it is available only through select employers and health plans. The book, also backed by the American Cancer Society, fills this gap and allows access to the methods proven successful for more than 2 million tobacco users.

Quit Smoking for Life offers the expertise of 200 trained Quit Coaches – the same Quit Coaches accessed by participants in the Quit For Life Program. The book is endorsed by Michael Fiore, the director of the Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention at University of Wisconsin and a nationally recognized expert on tobacco, and Daniel Eisenberg, the medical director of Cardiology at Saint Joseph Medical Center.

The book is available on Amazon.com, and is sold in leading bookstores, including Barnes & Noble, Powell’s Books and Books A Million. It is also available at airport bookstores.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?