PHARMACY

Hal Rosenbluth to exit Walgreens

BY Michael Johnsen

DEERFIELD, Ill. — Walgreens on Friday announced that Hal Rosenbluth will retire as president of its health-and-wellness division in April but will continue with the company as a senior consultant to the CEO for healthcare services.

Rosenbluth was a co-founder of Take Care Health Systems, which was acquired by Walgreens in 2007. Prior to that, he led Rosenbluth International, a global travel management company, which he sold to American Express in 2003.

“Hal’s entrepreneurial spirit was instrumental to Walgreens as we expanded our pharmacy, health and wellness services through our Take Care retail clinics and worksite health centers,” stated Walgreens president and CEO Greg Wasson. “He helped these businesses become key components of Walgreens’ broad set of health-and-wellness offerings. Under Hal’s leadership, we have successfully restructured our sales and client services organization and have added to our clinical capabilities.”

“As patients increasingly become shoppers of health care, continuing to grow our services through our Take Care retail clinics and worksite health centers headquartered in Conshohocken, Pa., is central to executing our strategy of improving access and convenience in meeting the everyday needs of our patients and customers,” Wasson added.

As part of Walgreens’ community-based health solutions, the Take Care retail clinics and worksite health centers, led by Peter Hotz, now will report to Mark Wagner, president of the company’s community management division. The sales and client services organization, led by chief client officer Joe Terrion, and clinical services, led by chief medical officer Cheryl Pegus, will become part of the Walgreens pharmacy, health-and-wellness services and solutions division, under Kermit Crawford, president of the division.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

PhRMA: More than 400 rare disease treatments in development, pending approval

BY Alaric DeArment

WASHINGTON — More than 400 drugs are in late-stage clinical development or awaiting Food and Drug Administration approval as treatments for rare diseases, according to a report by the drug industry lobby.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America said a record 460 drugs were in late stages of the pipeline in a report timed to coincide with Rare Disease Day on Feb. 28. The rare or “orphan” diseases — defined by the government as those that affect fewer than 200,000 Americans — range from autoimmune disorders to cancer to blood disorders to genetic diseases. In total, there are 7,000 known rare diseases, about half of which affect children, and 80% of rare diseases affect fewer than 6,000 patients.

“Once you’ve talked to a desperate parent whose child is suffering or dying, you will be forever convinced of the need for medical innovation, including for terrible diseases that afflict even just a few,” PhRMA president and CEO John Castellani said. “Researchers at biopharmaceutical companies are working every day to bring hope to patients with limited options.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

c.schiff says:
Mar-13-2013 10:33 am

Just a shout out to NORD ,Global Genes, Genetic Alliance and all of the wonderful organizations that are fighting for these treatments and for helping get more attention to Rare Diseases. As a Rare Mom, its a full time job finding the name of the disease, educating the medical community about it, and then getting the government to help us. This is an incredible community of intelligent, brave people.Great job moving the needle.

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Fatty liver may impose diabetes risk

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — Over the years, a fatty liver has become an indicator of obesity and insulin resistance among humans, but researchers have found that people with fatty livers are five times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than their healthier counterparts.

In a new study slated for publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, researchers examined 11,091 Koreans with fasting insulin concentration, a marker of insulin resistance, and diagnosed the subjects with a fatty liver via an abdominal ultrasound. At baseline, 27% of the population had been diagnosed with having fatty liver.

The researchers followed up after five years of the initial examination and found that regardless of baseline insulin concentration, patients with fatty livers had significantly more metabolic abnormalities, including higher glucose and triglyceride concentration and lower HDL ("good" cholesterol) levels. They concluded that patients with fatty livers were five times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.

"We believe that a diagnosis of fatty liver should raise an alarm for impending Type 2 diabetes," said Sun Kim of Stanford University and senior author of the study. "Our study shows that fatty liver, as diagnosed by ultrasound, strongly predicts the development of Type 2 diabetes, regardless of insulin concentration."

"Our study shows in a large population of relatively healthy individuals that identifying fatty liver by ultrasound predicts the development of Type 2 diabetes in five years," Kim added. "In addition, our findings reveal a complex relationship between baseline fatty liver and fasting insulin concentration."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?