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H. D. Smith names new head of its home healthcare division

BY Michael Johnsen

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — H. D. Smith, one of the nation’s largest pharmaceutical wholesalers, on Monday named Timothy Booth to corporate VP and head of its home healthcare division. Booth will report to Christopher Smith, H. D. Smith’s president and COO.

“One of the nation’s important healthcare trends is the shift of patients from hospitals to home where they can advance their rehabilitation and wellness," stated Dale Smith, H. D. Smith chairman and CEO. "Meeting our customers’ and patients’ needs requires granular ability to ensure health products reach those in need to advance their care. … Timothy Booth’s success in managing businesses across multiple health product sectors, and commitment to improving the patient experience and supporting patient care, will enhance our industry-leading customer service and further bolster our HHC offerings.” 

Booth brings to H. D. Smith nearly 20 years of expertise in the pharmaceutical manufacturing, packaging and distribution industries as a corporate executive and counselor. Most recently, he was an independent consultant providing guidance to companies in pharmaceutical industry strategy, operations, operating metrics, product pricing mechanisms and technical and regulatory information; prior to that role, he was president and CEO of PrePak Holdings, a pharmaceutical and consumer care contract packaging company based in Cookeville, Tenn. He also served as president of McKesson’s RxPak division, where he increased division revenue from $625 million to $1.2 billion, H. D. Smith reported.

Booth earned his bachelor’s and Master of Business Administration from Cleveland State University.  


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Study finds hearing loss a significant drag on seniors’ quality of life

BY Alaric DeArment

MINNETONKA, Minn. — Some of the most commonly cited health problems affecting the elderly are hypertension, stroke and osteoporosis, but a new study highlights what researchers call an even bigger problem.

Americans ages 65 years and older said that hearing impairment affects their quality of life physically and mentally more than high blood pressure, stroke, osteoporosis, sciatica and cancer, according to the study, released Thursday by AARP Services and UnitedHealthcare.

The study, published in the journal Quality of Life Research, used data from the "Health Update Survey" and the "Veterans RAND 12-item health status" survey, dividing respondents into groups that experienced hearing impairment and those that didn’t and examining the extent to which hearing loss affected respondents physical component score, or PCS, and mental component score, or MCS. A three-point change in one of the scores is considered clinically meaningful, but the study found that hearing loss lowered the PCS by 3.25 points and MCS by 3.22 points.

"These findings indicate that hearing impairment can affect mental and physical quality of life to a greater extent than hypertension, osteoporosis or even stroke," UnitedHealth Group EVP business initiatives and clinical affairs Richard Migliori said. "Given the significant burden hearing loss has on quality of life, we believe this study highlights an opportunity for physicians to develop treatment programs that enhance not only older adults’ hearing, but also their mental and emotional health."


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Freedom of choice

BY Rob Eder

Restricted pharmacy networks are becoming more prevalent, and mandatory mail has long been a threat, but the good news among Patient Views panelists is that more than 8-out-of-10 say their insurance allows them to go to the pharmacy of their choice, according to an exclusive survey of nearly 800 patients conducted by AccentHealth and DSN in late July and early August.

Stay tuned this week, as Patient Views further explores pharmacy satisfaction and what it would take to get them to break allegiances and switch pharmacies.

To see more Patient Views, click here.

Patient Views is a new, exclusive consumer insights feature that will be appear in every edition of DSN magazine and the daily e-newsletter DSN A.M. If you could ask 4,000 patients anything at all, what would it be? Send your questions to reder@lf.com.

Does your insurance allow you to go to the pharmacy of your choice?

Source: AccentHealth. To view the methodology, click here.

 

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