HEALTH

Grandmother’s diet may up breast cancer risk in future generations

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Can what grandma consumed during pregnancy up her granddaughter’s risk of breast cancer? According to a new study, it’s possible.

According to researchers at Georgetown University’s Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, which tested this theory on a population of rats, found that an elder female that consumed a high fat-concentration diet may fall onto future generations, and that the quantity of food does not necessarily factor in (average meal consumption was noted). The study’s lead investigator, Sonia de Assis, a postdoctoral fellow at Lombardi, said fatty foods may cause an increase in terminal end buds in the breast tissue– structures where breast cancer can develop, she said.

“The implications from this study are that pregnant mothers need to eat a well balanced diet because they may be affecting the future health of their daughters and granddaughters,” said de Assis.

The results were presented at the AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010.

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Type 1 diabetic teens experience stress when monitoring condition, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

A new study published in the April 7 issue of Adolescent Health suggested that teens with Type 1 diabetes may undergo stress when managing their condition.

Researchers, led by Korey Hood, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital — monitored 146 diabetic teens for a six month period and noted that teens who started taking more responsibility for their own care (and who had more conflict with parents) became less diligent about monitoring their blood glucose levels and had increased levels of hemoglobin A1c.

 

"What you tend to see as you look at large-scale clinical data is that A1c trends from the age of 12 or 13 steadily climb into young adulthood, and then it starts to decline in the mid-20s," Hood said in a news release from the Center for the Advancement of Health.

 

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Airborne appoints new COO

BY Michael Johnsen

MINNEAPOLIS Airborne on Thursday announced that Libby Trader has joined the company as COO.

“We are excited to have [Trader] join the company as we work to grow and expand the Airborne brand. [Trader’s] strategic planning and marketing expertise, as well as her proven results in consumer products and retail make her an outstanding addition to our team,” stated Marti Morfitt, Airborne CEO.

Prior to Airborne, Trader was general manager of Lakewinds Natural Foods, a 13,000 member-owned natural and organic foods cooperative, where she was responsible for strategic planning, marketing, store operations and profitability of its three Minnesota locations.

Trader holds a master’s in business administration from the University of North Carolina and a bachelor’s in marketing from the University of Utah.

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