HEALTH

Getting some ‘Help’

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — A consumer’s internal alarm bell usually is tripped when a company tries to sell him or her on a “less-is-more” proposition, because it usually really means “less-is-less.” That is until Help Remedies came along with its “less-is-less-but-that’s-better” proposition.


It’s a minimalist movement of single-ingredient OTCs — less drugs, less dyes, less coatings and less confusion because all products are named “Help I have …” followed by the one symptom treated.


Help Remedies plans to launch “Help I have chest congestion” (guaifenesin) in December at its standard $3.99 suggested retail price.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Continua members tout innovation in Japan

BY Michael Johnsen

TOKYO — Drug Store News caught up with Continua Health Alliance’s executive director Chuck Parker following the CEATEC Japan conference, an IT and electronics trade show, to get a glimpse into what tomorrow’s self-care diagnostic devices might look like.


As many as 25 Continua members showcased new consumer healthcare services in early October at the show, some of which are slated to launch in November in Japan.


For example, NTT Resonant, a leading Japanese Internet service provider, showcased forthcoming functions of its health management services “goo Karada Log,” which works in concert with blood-pressure monitors by A&D. And Alive, a wireless solution provider, demonstrated Bluetooth-compatible 
data-exchange devices, connecting data from those monitors to personal laptops, for example.


“These are commercial products that will be marketed to … Japanese consumers,” Parker told DSN. The Japanese market, which benefits from a more robust healthcare IT infrastructure, may serve as a good indicator for future U.S. launches. “What they do in Japan tends to work fairly well in the [United States], as well,” Parker said, especially as Japanese consumers tend to rapidly adopt new technologies. 


Parker suggested that the U.S. market is as much as two years behind the Japanese market, but mostly due to regulatory approval processes at the Food and Drug Administration.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Aggressive ads up awareness

BY Michael Johnsen

The personal massager category still is small at only $3.2 million for the 12 weeks ended Sept. 4, according to SymphonyIRI Group data across food, drug and mass (excluding Walmart), but the growth rate is trending at a 20.6% clip.


Church & Dwight has been the most aggressive in its advertising to date. A commercial aired during Bravo’s “The Real Housewives of New Jersey” touted the company’s Trojan Vibrations Twister as so good it will “blow your hair back.” At $59.99, that massager is only available through TrojanVibrations.com. But Trojan’s full retail line is prominent on that page as well.

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Sexual Wellness Sell-Through Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?