HEALTH

Flu season still ‘Texas big’ in Lone Star State

BY Michael Johnsen

DEERFIELD, Ill. — The Lone Star State remains the chief hold out with regard to extending a flu season that's been winding down. According to the latest Walgreens Flu Index, four of the top 10 markets still experiencing high levels of flu activity are in Texas, including three of the top five markets.

For the week of March 12, the top 10 markets for flu activity were:

  1. El Paso, Texas (Las Cruces, N.M.);
  2. Tyler-Longview (Lufkin & Nacogdoches), Texas;
  3. Greensboro-High Point-Winston Salem, N.C.;
  4. Harlingen-Weslaco-Brownsville-McAllen, Texas;
  5. Shreveport, La.;
  6. Knoxville, Tenn.;
  7. Tri-Cities, Tenn.-Va.;
  8. Corpus Christi, Texas;
  9. Raleigh-Durham (Fayetteville), N.C.; and
  10. Oklahoma City.

The Walgreens Flu Index is a weekly report developed to provide state- and market-specific information regarding flu activity, and ranking of those experiencing the highest incidences of influenza across the country. The Flu Index shows which populations are experiencing the most incidences of influenza each week based on Index methodology. The data does not measure actual levels or severity of flu activity.

The Walgreens Flu Index is compiled using weekly retail prescription data for antiviral medications used to treat influenza across Walgreens locations nationwide. The data is analyzed at state and geographic market levels to measure absolute impact and incremental change of antiviral medications on a per store average basis, and does not include markets in which Walgreens has fewer than 10 retail locations.

 

 

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Latest Clif Bar YouTube video embodies lifestyle marketing

BY Michael Johnsen

EMERYVILLE, Calif. — It's not a brand; it's an adventure. Clif Bar on Monday released a video that helps capture the "je ne sais quoi" spirit that has driven brand sales to the top of sports nutrition charts across mass outlets.

Clif Bar has been and remains the leading vendor of nutritional and intrinsic health value bars as sold in U.S. multi-outlets.  The company commands a 24.8% dollar share of that category with $590.5 million in sales on 11.5% growth for the 52 weeks ended Dec. 25, according to IRI data.

The  video (embedded above), however, does not promote bars. It promotes a lifestyle.

The idea began in San Francisco with a small group of friends who were tired of running races and hungry for a new flavor of adventure, Clif Bar noted.

"We found 13 people who thought it'd be a great idea to live in a van for three days while running around the circumference of Hawaii's big island," the narrator states. "We're here searching, but not in the grand sense of hoping to uncover a gold mine. We're searching because we're curious about [what's] around the next bend [and] to see how we feel running at 2 in the morning."

 

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Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine recommend OTC availability for contraceptives

BY Michael Johnsen

BALTIMORE — Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine on Tuesday made the case for the Rx-to-OTC switch of oral contraceptives.

Moreover, the experts reported, the evidence also supports OTC access for teens and adult women, citing studies showing that teens are capable of safely and properly using "the pill" to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

"Decades of research show that a majority of adolescents initiate sex before the age of 18 and that earlier use of contraception reduces the risk of teen pregnancy," stated Krishna Upadhya, assistant professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the paper's lead author. "Our review strongly suggests that giving teens easier access to various contraceptives will not lead to more sex but would result in fewer unwanted pregnancies."

The review by Upadhya and her colleagues comes as reproductive health service providers and federal policymakers continue to debate moving oral contraceptives to OTC status, particularly for teenagers. Additionally, a partnership between HRA Pharma and Ibis Reproductive Health to begin an application for an OTC oral contraceptive to the Food and Drug Administration was recently announced.

For the review, the Johns Hopkins-led team looked for teen-specific data related to the safety and effectiveness of oral contraceptives, pregnancy risk associated with typical use of various forms of contraception, teen ability to use oral contraceptives correctly and consistently, the impact of OTC access on sexual behaviors and concerns that OTC access might reduce clinician counseling opportunities with young people.

The pill is already the most commonly used hormonal method of birth control by teens and other women of reproductive age in the U.S., according to the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth. That survey estimates that 54% of female ages 15 to 19 have used it. Proponents of OTC status say easier, wider access to the pill will further increase contraceptive use, further lowering teen pregnancy rates and abortion.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that births to teens in the U.S. reached a historic low of 22.3 live births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 19 in 2015. A recent analysis by one of the paper's authors found that the decline in pregnancy risk among U.S. teens between 2007 and 2012 was entirely attributable to increased use of contraception. Critics of OTC status say they fear wider access would lead to more teen sex, sexually transmitted disease and the safety concerns of long-term use, the Johns Hopkins researchers noted.

The research team also reviewed existing research regarding teens' ability to use oral contraceptives consistently and correctly. Upadhya says studies of adolescent development suggest that most teens have the reasoning skills to make informed decisions about oral contraceptives. Because the use of oral contraceptives is a daily behavior not tied to specific or imminent sexual or emotional pressures, teens may actually be more likely to use them consistently, she argued. According to Upadhya, the research suggests that factors like having routines and feeling in control of the decision are more important to consistent use of pills than age.

In addition, Upadhya said, studies comparing the contraceptive failure rate in teens versus young women showed no significant differences, and one study that gauged teens' ability to answer questions about correct use of oral contraceptives found that 90% answered them correctly.

The team reviewed the impact of FDA action in 2012 making the hormonal emergency contraceptive marketed as "Plan B" available OTC for teens. Upadhya and colleagues found that teen use of Plan B increased from 8% in 2002 to 22% in 2011 to 2013. Sales of all female contracteptives like Plan B totaled $338.9 million for the 52 weeks ended Dec. 25 across total U.S. multi-outlets, according to IRI, representing growth of 8.4%.

Finally, the researchers considered the potential of OTC status to negatively impact clinicians' opportunities to counsel teens and provide additional sexual and reproductive health care. The team found that the percentage of teens who get recommended annual preventive visits is already low. According to one study of 14- to 17-year-olds from 2000 to 2004, only 38% received the recommended annual visit, and of those who did receive a visit, only 40% reported having private discussions with their clinician. Upadhya said  the results suggest that providing alternative access points outside of clinics, when possible, is critical to ensuring that all teens in need can use effective contraceptives. Because not all methods can be self-administered, however, Upadhya stresses the importance of continued efforts to ensure that teens have contraceptive visits with clinicians.

"Oral contraceptives are popular, safe and effective methods of pregnancy prevention for women and teens," she said. "Our review emphasizes that any future over-the-counter pill has the potential to benefit teens, and there is no scientific rationale to restrict access based on age."

A report on the literature review was published on March 14 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

 

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