BEAUTY CARE

Fekkai Salon Color offers salon-quality at home

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK Frederic Fekkai, a luxury hair care brand, has introduced Fekkai Salon Color, a premium hair color collection that promises salon-quality results at home.

The introduction marks the first time Fekkai has entered the realm of at-home hair color. There are 20 signature colors in the line. The collection launched in August at Bloomingdale’s with a suggested retail price of $30.

With its exclusive pre- and post-conditioning treatments, this at-home hair color system improves the overall health of the hair, according to the company. Fekkai clinical studies have shown that testers experienced 40 percent more softness, silkiness and shine after using Fekkai Salon Color.

The professional bowl and brush system provides thorough blending and controlled, even color application and distribution for a salon-like result, according to the company.

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The ‘demetrosexualization’ of men’s grooming

BY Alaric DeArment

Not long ago, metrosexual was the “in” thing, its image defined by such celebrities as actor George Clooney, soccer player David Beckham and the rock band The Killers. Personal care for men went beyond the usual showering, shaving and deodorant and branched into skin care and color coordination, withering taboos that forbade men from using such products. The personal care industry followed suit.

It didn’t take long for a backlash to form, though. An opposite extreme called “retrosexual” emerged—in other words, Homer Simpson chic. But the expanded market for men’s personal care products has not disappeared and probably won’t, according to a report released in May by Euromonitor International.

“The growth in men’s spending on beauty trends is not a fad, but a definite sustainable trend,” the report stated. “The social taboos around men’s grooming continue to break down, and more men will be willing to spend on skin care products that are targeted specifically at them, creating very strong opportunities for mass products.”

Euromonitor’s research appeared consistent with the activities of a number of companies, including Nivea, which recently expanded the Nivea for Men.

“Our target is the man who wants to look and feel good on the inside and out, while still retaining all the qualities that come with being a man,” said Joe Venezia, marketing director for the product line. “We specifically designed products that are easy-to-use and effective, while being masculine.”

Nivea’s history with men’s grooming has deep roots. In 1922, it began marketing its first shaving soap. In the early 1990s, it became one of the first companies to capitalize on what would later become known as the metrosexual market.

But while metrosexual products often have been almost indistinguishable from their counterparts for women, Nivea for Men products offer a more toned-down approach.

“We focus on a very specific target group to provide products for men who don’t want to spend too much time on grooming, but want to still look good,” Venezia said, adding that Nivea first launched the line to provide an effective lotion with a more masculine scent.

Unilever has sought to enter the market, as well, with its Vaseline Men line of products. The products, which include lotions for the hands, face and body and a version of Lever 2000 soap with Vaseline, emphasize skin care while also playing down appeals to metrosexual consumers, noting that 17 percent of men regularly moisturize their bodies, compared with 51 percent of women.

If Nivea and Vaseline have toned down the metrosexual aspect of their products, Dial has gone to the opposite extreme with Dial for Men.

Dial makes it clear that it isn’t after metrosexual dollars with the product’s Web site, which opens with a wood-paneling background, a cartoon of a heavyset, hairy man and the trademarked slogan, “Maintenance for Your Mansuit.” In its “Official Unofficial Rulebook of Man,” the site advised: “No man smells pretty. Never tell him that,” “Hand towels never have to coordinate with anything,” and “If you can’t pick it up and eat it, it can’t be your favorite food.” Meanwhile, the TV ad shows all the symbols of American masculinity: football players, loggers, bowling and arm wrestling.

“The ‘manly man’ area was a definite white space when Dial for Men launched,” said Laura Skibba, senior product manager for Dial Body Wash. “And just because you are a manly man doesn’t mean you still don’t want to look and smell good.”

According to an August 2007 report published by the Institute for the Study of American Popular Culture, ABC’s “Good Morning America” proclaimed the demise of the metrosexual as a segment in 2006. Still, reports of the metrosexual fad’s demise appear at least somewhat exaggerated, at least in other countries.

Superdrug, one of the United Kingdom’s largest health and beauty retailers, announced that on Aug. 6, it would begin marketing a line of makeup for men under Taxi Cosmetics’ brand that includes male versions of eyeliner and mascara.

“We’ve developed essentials that a guy would perhaps normally borrow from his other half,” Taxi’s Peter Kelly said in a statement. “It’s about subtle makeup rather than wanting to create the drag queen look.”

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Innovation likely to continue brushing up oral care category

BY Antoinette Alexander

Oral hygiene experienced a brushing up in 2007 and emerged as one of the fastest-growing sectors in the U.S. cosmetics and toiletries industries thanks in large part to a strong surge of hot new products. However, 2008 looks to be more challenging for manufacturers as consumers tighten their wallets amid tough economic conditions. Given this, products with added benefits likely will remain key growth drivers.

“The sector, which relies on consumers’ willingness to pay extra for added convenience products, will find a thriftier consumer in 2008 as the U.S. economy continues to struggle,” stated research firm Euromonitor International in its most recent U.S. Oral Hygiene report.

Euromonitor International predicted that consumer expenditure growth in 2008 (in current prices) on personal care will slow to 2 percent—the lowest rate since 2001. This sluggish growth will spell challenges for the oral hygiene segment and manufacturers that hope to grow the segment with premium-priced value-added innovations.

If this proves to be the case, it will be a shift from the growth experienced in 2007. For example, toothpaste, which accounts for more than 35 percent of total sector growth, had its best performance since 2001, according to Euromonitor International. Fueling the growth was, in part, the continued success of Crest Pro-Health, launched in 2006, and Colgate Total’s successful marketing campaign.

Manual brushes with added benefits, such as Colgate’s 360 or Oral B’s Pulsar, which are priced four to six times higher than a generic manual toothbrush, helped drive growth of manual brushes by 2 percent—a category that tends to be flat, the research firm noted.

Furthermore, tooth whiteners experienced a rebound—growing by 10 percent in 2007, after declining by 27 percent between 2003 and 2006—as manufacturers looked to brighten the category with such innovative launches as Listerine Whitening Strips and Aquafresh White Trays.

Manufacturers, however, are hoping to continue the momentum as consumers continue to place value on the cosmetic aspects of proper oral health, such as whiter teeth and controlling bad breath.

For example, Procter & Gamble launched for 2008 its new Crest Whitestrips Daily Whitening Plus Tartar Protection, marking the first time that Crest Whitestrips has gone beyond whitening. The strips promise to protect against daily tartar buildup, whiten and protect from everyday stain buildup.

Earlier this year, Colgate announced that products planned for launch in first quarter 2008 included Colgate Total Advanced Whitening and Colgate Total Advanced Fresh toothpastes, Colgate 360 Degree Deep Clean manual toothbrush and Colgate 360 Degree Sonic Power battery toothbrush.

Dr. Fresh is looking to invigorate the mouthwash category with the launch of Dentyne Ice mouth rinse, which features the same flavors as Dentyne arctic chill and shiver mint chewing gum. The mouthwash is alcohol-free.

Meanwhile, SunTrust Robinson Humphrey analyst William Chappell is optimistic about Chattem’s ACT mouthwash brand, which it snapped up from Johnson & Johnson.

Sales forecast: Oral care 2012
Consumers will look for added-value products

*In U.S. millionsSource: Euromonitor International estimates
  2007 2012
Toothpaste 2,078.80 2,025.2
Toothbrushes 1,699.1 1,868.8
Mouthwash 914.4 924.4
Denture care 407.2 380.4
Tooth whiteners 378.8 397.8
Dental floss 297.8 296.1
Mouth fresheners 141.7 111.0
Total oral care 5,899.70 6,003.5

“In our opinion, ACT is emerging as the real jewel of the five brands acquired from J&J. Recall, ACT had seen limited advertising and only one product extension in the five years before Chattem acquired it in early 2007,” stated Chappell in a recent research note. “Since the acquisition, Chattem has improved the packaging, added a 33-ounce bottle (expanding the addressable market by 40 percent) and stepped up advertising. As a result, the brand not only has grown in excess of 20 percent over the past year, it also has gained market share, the only brand in the category to do so during that time frame.”

He noted that ACT already has grown from a $40 million brand to a $60 million brand under Chattem’s ownership. He said it is likely ACT could grow to $100 million in the next two to three years.

“Moving to 2009, we expect the company to leverage its strengthened position with retailers to gain additional facings for new product extensions and more favorable shelf space at retail,” Chappell stated.

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