HEALTH

Fairhaven Health presents clinical study results for FertilAid for Men

BY Michael Johnsen

BELLINGHAM, Wash. Fairhaven Health, which manufactures a male fertility supplement, recently presented a clinical study at the American Society of Andrology’s annual meeting, the company announced Tuesday.

Results from a recent clinical study indicate that FertilAid for Men provides significant improvements in sperm quality for men with abnormal sperm parameters. In particular, results of the 90-day, double blind, placebo-controlled study suggest that FertilAid for Men supports significant increases in the total number of normal motile sperm. Previous clinical studies have suggested a strong relationship between the “total normal-motile sperm count” and the fertility of the man.

“Most of the men that had increased sperm counts while taking FertilAid for Men also showed improvements of 20% or more in the number of healthy sperm,” stated lead researcher J. Ellington.

FertilAid for Men is a male fertility supplement that integrates vitamins, antioxidants, a proprietary blend of herbal ingredients and the amino acid, l-carnitine. Scientific literature suggests that antioxidants can improve male fertility by reducing oxidative stress and damage to spermatozoa, while supporting fundamental protective functions of the seminal plasma which insulate and nourish sperm. In independent studies, antioxidants reduce “free-radical” damage, in particular to the sperm’s DNA or genetic material, resulting in better pregnancy outcomes.

Research on the amino acid, l-carnitine, yields similar pro-fertility findings: L-carnitine supports “sperm metabolism”, or the ability for sperm to break down complex molecules to produce energy. L-carnitine has been shown in a number of clinical studies to enhance several fundamental sperm parameters, including sperm concentration, motility and normal morphology.

Fairhaven Health’s distribution partners include drugstore.com, BabyCenter and CVS.com, as well as a number of clinics and private practices nationwide.

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Report: Standards for glucose monitors may change

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK The name of the game in diabetes management is compliance. For patients and their healthcare advocates/practitioners, compliance translates into better health outcomes that will prove to be considerably less costly over the life of the patient. And for retailers and blood-glucose meter manufacturers, compliance translates into a high-frequency/high-marketbasket consumer as compared with the average pharmacy patron.

 

So an article in The New York Times questioning the validity of meters sold in the United States could be cause for considerable concern — if American diabetics have less faith in the accuracy of their meters, then they’re likely to be less compliant in testing. And diabetics who don’t have their blood-sugar levels in check would mean poorer health, higher healthcare costs, a decline in pharmacy trips and the loss of that highly-coveted diabetes consumer.

 

As expressed in the Times report, creating a lack of faith in meter results by questioning meter efficacy is what the agency is attempting to avoid.

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CDC: H1N1 virus expected to make a large impact on upcoming cough-cold-flu season

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA The novel H1N1 virus is expected to make a big impact in the coming cough/cold/flu season, though just by how much is hard to determine, noted Anne Schuchat, director of the National Center For Immunization and Respiratory Diseases for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, during a press conference held Friday.

Based on the course of the novel H1N1 virus in the spring, between 6% and 8% of people in those communities that were affected came down with the novel flu, at a time when seasonal flu incidence is relatively zero. “In a longer winter season, attack rates would probably reach higher levels than that,” Schuchat said. “Maybe two or three times as high as that.” During seasonal influenza in the winter, as many as15% of people develop influenza-like illness.

Worse-case scenario models used as pre-pandemic planning tools have accounted for as many as 40% of Americans to be infected, or to be tasked with caring for an infected relative, this fall — which is expected to cause mass absenteeism across schools and work forces.

“Much of our framing has been focused on the very severe impact where 40% of the workforce might be absent because they’re sick or staying home to care for a sick person,” Schuchat said, but that isn’t the most likely scenario. “Right now we’re not expecting that high an absentee rate, but we are expecting challenges.”

As of Friday, there were 43,771 confirmed novel H1N1 cases, including 302 deaths. But that case count is a far cry from accurately measuring the number of cases, Schuchat warned, especially as the number of states actually testing for the novel H1N1 virus drops.

“We believe there have been well over a million cases of the new H1N1 virus so far in The United States,” Schuchat said.  “And the patterns that we’re seeing right now are 20 states reporting widespread or regional influenza activity. … It’s very unusual for that kind of illness to be occurring at this time of the year.  The Novel H1N1 viruses are making up 98% of all the subtyped viruses we have, subtype influenza A viruses, and we’re seeing them dominate here in the U.S.”

The CDC also updated its vaccination recommendations Friday. “At this point, 83% of the population is recommended to get an annual flu vaccine and we recommend it for anyone who wants to reduce their risk of flu,” Schuchat said. “Unfortunately, only about 40% of the U.S. population received the flu vaccine last year, so we’re really recommending an intensifying use of this vaccine because it does protect against illness and complications like hospitalization and severe outcomes.”

Schuchat also stressed that health care workers need to get vaccinated, especially this year. “We recommend them strongly to receive the seasonal flu vaccine,” Schuchat said. “And I’m expecting when H1N1 vaccine recommendations come out it’s very, very likely health care workers will be in that group that ought to get vaccines as well.” Presently, CDC is estimating that enough novel H1N1 vaccine, if approved, may be ready by mid-October to sustain a national vaccination program.

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