PHARMACY

Excelling in diabetes management, care

BY Richard Monks

From left to right: Sean Allman, Clarrisa Wallace, Kristy Solominksy, Deborah DeYoung and Sonia Borja

For the pharmacists working at Albertsons/Safeway, few things are as important as ensuring that their patients get the best care.

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Five pharmacists at the company’s Randalls supermarkets in Austin, Texas, for example, have dedicated themselves to diabetes management. Since February 2013, the pharmacists — Clarissa Wallace, Kristy Solominsky, Deborah DeYoung, Sonia Borja and Sal Solis — have been working closely with the city of Austin, insurer United Healthcare and Austin-based Seton Hospital to help municipal employees learn how to manage their diabetes.

Under the collaborative-care program, city workers are given the flexibility to choose appointment dates and times that fit their schedules. In addition, the pharmacists participate in periodic city-run wellness events where they provide diabetes screenings and get eligible patients enrolled in United Healthcare’s Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance program.

After completing an eight-hour class offered by Seton Hospital’s Center for Diabetes Education, patients see one of the Randalls pharmacists between four and six times over the next year, and their HgA1c and lipid levels are tested. In addition, the pharmacists work with patients to set achievable and measurable goals specific to each person’s individual needs. Since the program’s inception, more than 500 Austin employees have made more than 2,000 visits to the Randalls diabetes specialists.

Earlier this year, the healthcare providers met to evaluate the program’s progress, finding that hospitalizations and emergency room visits among city workers had declined dramatically, and medication adherence had spiked.

In another example of Albertsons/Safeway pharmacists’ total commitment to their patients, Sean Allman, who joined the company two years ago as Safeway’s director of pharmacy, has spearheaded a variety of clinical projects and educational programs in California.

Allman, who also is an adjunct faculty member at California Northstate University College of Pharmacy in Sacramento and a preceptor for students there and at the University of California San Francisco and at nearby Tuoro University’s College of Pharmacy, has worked closely with other faculty members at these schools to help students develop the skills they need to operate in the real world.

“Not only is Sean an effective role model for pharmacy students, he also works well with patients and staff members,” a Safeway spokeswoman said, noting Allman’s efforts to provide a Mirixa clinical platform, a variety of medication therapy management programs, biometric screenings and flu clinics, and his plans to develop a travel health program for Safeway stores.

In addition, she noted that Allman is working to widen the scope of the services he provides patients — working to become an accredited diabetes educator and completing several programs that will see him become accredited as an HIV pharmacist.

Outside of Safeway, Allman has been involved in numerous community events, including the Annual Family Health Fair in San Francisco, which this month will offer 100 visitors free flu shots, and a 2014 presentation at the San Francisco Senior Center on the benefits of the Zostavax shingles vaccine.

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PHARMACY

Rite Aid’s Afilaka goes ‘above and beyond’

BY Michael Johnsen

Femi Afilaka

For Rite Aid’s pharmacist Femi Afilaka, pharmacy is about “going above and beyond.”

“It is a personal habit of mine to sometimes reach out [to my patients] when either I haven’t seen a patient of mine for a long time or when they are not able to actually drive to the pharmacy,” Afilaka told Drug Store News. Afilaka will go out of his way to ensure his customer’s receive their medications when needed. “That ties into going above and beyond,” he said. “Not necessarily just staying within your job description, but stepping outside of the box and doing things that you know will help out your customers.”

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Afilaka is a pharmacist in a Newark, Del.-based Rite Aid store and has been with the company since March 2003. In that time he has developed a reputation for his devotion to patient care, for delivering that extra touch of customer service and for truly embracing the “fast and friendly” company initiative. And that solid work ethic also helps him lead by example as a pharmacist trainer for his district.

“When it comes to our associates and the people that I personally train, it is one of our core values to provide an environment that inspires and motivates the best people to work for us, at our stores,” he said. “They have to always possess a positive attitude … a positive attitude on a day-to-day basis will help them on their journey.“

His best advice for up-and-coming pharmacists? Look for challenging assignments. “You need to be able to challenge yourself and take responsibility for self-development,” he said. “Rite Aid already provides us with an environment that brings the best out of us as employees,” he added, but it’s up to each individual pharmacist to determine how to go “above and beyond.”

Afilaka is a certified CPR trainer, important because in order to be certified as an immunizing pharmacist, each pharmacist must be trained in how to administer CPR. “Throughout my career I’ve learned to take risks and be zealous. It’s hard for me to say no because I love to take on challenges,” he said. “I accept challenges because it helps me grow as a pharmacist and an individual.”

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CVS pharmacists show commitment to diversity

BY Richard Monks

Josephine Hau and Ali Hamed

Two pharmacists working at CVS/pharmacy locations 3,000 miles apart exemplify the chain’s commitment to the diverse array of communities it serves.

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Because of their efforts, Josephine Hau, a CVS pharmacist in Baldwin Park, Calif., and Ali Hamed, a pharmacist in the CVS store in Springhill, Fla., are national recipients of the company’s Paragon Award, an annual recognition of what CVS calls its “best of the best.”

“Our patients have a choice of where they can bring their scripts,” the 30-year-old Hamed said recently. “So we strive to earn their trust by giving them quality care, our full attention and the best customer service every time.”

A CVS spokesman called Hamed, the “go-to” pharmacist in his area for training new pharmacists and technicians, noting that earlier this year he organized an immunization program for local nursing home patients and provided medication education through community outreach programs.

Hamed, who said he was inspired to go into pharmacy after watching his father deal with Type 1 diabetes throughout his life, noted that working for CVS allows him to be part of a comprehensive healthcare team.

“I feel my team not only includes my immediate pharmacy staff, but also includes team members from other areas of the company that together connect the dots to ensure easy and convenient means for patients to receive their prescriptions,” he said.

For her part, CVS executives said Hau has shown “excellent leadership of her pharmacy team.”

As a pharmacist in a community with a large Chinese population, Hau’s ability to speak her patients’ native language provides an invaluable service to the community and helps ensure that patients fully understand their medications and how to use them.

It has helped drive patients from Baldwin Hills and the surrounding area into her store and led many physicians in the area to refer their Chinese-speaking patients to her.

Outside of the store, Hau volunteers her time to counsel seniors on their medications, creating what executives said is “an environment that allows them to feel comfortable to approach her with any question they may have.”

In addition, she works to promote the profession by speaking at high school career fairs where she advises prospective pharmacy students about the classes they should be taking to get into pharmacy school and regularly mentors students already enrolled in a college-level pharmacy program.

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