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Equitance skin brightening collection takes holistic approach to beauty

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO — Sunstar Americas has introduced its new Equitance skin care to the U.S. market to give women brighter, more radiant skin starting from the inside out.

Combining Japanese simplicity with botanicals and internal supplements, the collection includes a Brightening Foaming Cleanser, Toning Lotion, Hydrating Brightening Cream, Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 36 and Skin Radiance Dietary Supplement.

Over the last two decades, Sunstar researchers and scientists isolated the key factors that hinder radiance: specifically, dark spots and uneven skin tone — and the appearance of discolorations they create. Based on this research, Equitance uses two key components to target dark spots within select formulas, including an ingredient with brightening power combined with the second, a patented delivery system that uses microcapsules that resemble the multilayered membrane of the epidermis. Through this sustained delivery system, linoleic acid, a naturally occurring fatty acid that is clinically proven for its brightening efficacy, is released over time, resulting in a more even texture and tone, the company stated. To supplement the brightening treatments, Equitance skin care also works to hydrate skin using such natural ingredients as cherry blossom leaf extract and shell ginger extract.

In addition to focusing on treating skin topically, Equitance offers a dietary supplement that supports radiance from within the body. The inclusion of a supplement within Equitances’ offerings positions them as a brand that works to perfect inner and outer beauty through topical skin care and diet, offering a complete 360 approach to holistic beauty, the company stated.
 

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Sandoz launches generic version of Eisai’s Dacogen

BY Michael Johnsen

PRINCETON, N.J. — Sandoz last week announced the U.S. market introduction of decitabine for injection, a generic version of Eisai’s Dacogen. According to IMS Health, aggregate U.S. sales for Dacogen were approximately $251 million for the 12 months ended April 2014. Sandoz will market decitabine injection in 20 mL/50 mg single-dose vials, the same size and strength marketed by the brand. 
 
Decitabine for injection is a prescription medicine for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, including previously treated and untreated MDS and de novo (cause unknown) and secondary (treatment-related) MDS of all French-American-British subtypes (refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and intermediate-1, intermediate-2 and high-risk International Prognostic Scoring System groups. 
 
There are about 13,000 new cases of myelodysplastic syndrome each year in the United States, and the number continues to grow given that the average age of the population has increased.
 
“We are pleased to add decitabine for injection to our strong portfolio of generic oncology injectables,” stated Peter Goldschmidt, president of Sandoz US. “We will continue to invest in this therapeutic area to strengthen and grow our oncology portfolio while increasing patient access to high-quality, cost-saving treatment options.”  
 
InnoPharma developed the generic formulation of decitabine for injection and entered into an agreement with Sandoz, pursuant to which Sandoz will sell, market and distribute decitabine for injection in the United States. 
 
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Study: More than half of people report swallowing difficulties with capsules/tablets

BY Michael Johnsen

PULLACH, Germany — More than 55% of people suffer from swallowing difficulties when taking tablets or capsules, which is likely to inhibit compliance, according to an international survey conducted by Spiegel Institute Mannheim on behalf of Hermes Pharma. 
 
“By offering an active ingredient solely as a tablet or capsule, pharmaceutical and life sciences companies ignore the needs of more than 50% of their target audience,” stated Thomas Hein, director business development and regulatory affairs at Hermes Pharma. “Given the weaknesses exhibited by conventional tablets and capsules, there is a significant opportunity to capture market share by formulating user-friendly dosage forms."
 
The survey targeted 1,000 people in the United States and Germany — together more than 2,000 — tailored to reflect overall population demographics in terms of age, gender and ethnicity, and to generate statistically reliable data. 
 
The oral route is considered a simple and cost-efficient way of delivery, with most pharmaceutical products and food/dietary supplements traditionally formulated as solid tablets or capsules. However, consumer habits and demands are changing. Today’s patients have grown accustomed to having freedom of choice and the benefits of convenience. They also enjoy instant access to a wealth of information, leading them to request specific products and treatments. To deliver medical and commercial success, pharmaceutical products will need to appeal to a wider range of preferences, from treatment needs through to lifestyle requirements. Entitled "A Hard Truth to Swallow," the study found that conventional tablets and capsules exhibit a range of drawbacks and may no longer be the best solution for large segments of the population. 
 
Over half of the people surveyed (50% in the United States; more than 60% in Germany) reported difficulties when swallowing tablets or capsules. Some 44% of participants 65 years or older were affected, and interestingly, an even greater number (70%) of younger people ages 16 to 34 years also reported this problem. A wide variety of reasons were cited, but the most frequent were related to tablets or capsules being too large to swallow, becoming stuck in the throat and having an unpleasant taste or odor. 
 
In order to overcome these difficulties, participants had turned to breaking tablets before swallowing (32% overall) or crushing them up and dissolving them in water (17% overall), both of which can affect bioavailability and medical efficacy. As many as 8% resorted to not taking their medication at all. 
 
Participants were asked to evaluate tablets/capsules and alternative, user-friendly dosage forms — such as effervescent and chewable tablets, instant drinks, orally-disintegrating granules and lozenges — based on their experience. They consistently scored conventional tablets and capsules lower on such characteristics as ease of swallowing, sensation in the mouth, package opening and ease of intake. 
 
Introducing products that are easy to swallow, convenient to take and taste well is likely to improve patient experience, increase compliance and boost the effectiveness of treatment, the report stated. Designing dosage forms to target different cultures, ages and preferences provides a means of better meeting the needs of specific market subsets. By creating user-friendly dosage forms, companies can differentiate themselves from competition, expand existing product lines, prolong product lifecycles, increase customer loyalty and at the same time increase revenues, according to the report. 
 
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