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Drano Snake Plus looks to tackle toughest clogs

BY Allison Cerra

RACINE, Wis. — Look out, plumbers: A new drain cleaning kit has come to town.

SC Johnson has boosted its Drano line with Drano Snake Plus, which promises to resolve the toughest clogs and touts a money-back guarantee. The product combines a flexible, easy-to-use 18-in. tool with a powerful pro concentrate gel that directly clings to the clog.

As part of the product launch, Drano has tapped Melinda and Rob Babiak of the online network LookWhatMomFound.com as the brand’s newest representatives.

Drano Snake Plus retails for $6.99 and is available in the home cleaning sections of food, drug, do-it-yourself and mass merchandise stores, such as Target, Walmart and CVS.

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Portion control shouldn’t be ignored by CPGs, Mintel says

BY Allison Cerra

CHICAGO — Research firm Mintel hosted its New Products and Consumer Insights Pavilion in New Orleans last week and highlighted the importance of portion size, noting that many consumer packaged goods companies ignore the nutrition guideline.

During the event, more than 600 attendees voted on their favorite portion-control items. Top products were Sensible Portions veggie snacks variety pack from Canada, followed by Emerald Nut and Granola Mix in the United States, and Krave Chocolate Hazelnut Cereal from Ireland, which captured second and third place, respectively.

“As companies respond to the new U.S. nutrition guidelines, it appears that the most important issue is largely ignored by CPG companies — portion size,” Mintel new products expert Lynn Dornblaser said. “100-calorie packs helped the U.S. consumer think about easy ways to control consumption, but today the packages are less focused on just 100 calories and more focused on providing additional benefits.”

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services released the seventh edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which placed stronger emphasis on reducing calorie consumption and increasing physical activity due to the rising obesity rates among adults and children. Officials took the guidelines further by ditching the food pyramid, which was updated in 2005, in favor of a plate-shaped symbol. The new symbol was unveiled in June.

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Survey: Food shoppers look for value amid rising prices, shrinking package sizes

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK — Rising food prices and shrinking package sizes are a top concern for consumers, according to Deloitte’s "2011 Consumer Food and Product Insight Survey."

Nearly 9-in-10 survey respondents (87.7%) believed prices in food stores are escalating, and almost three-quarters (74%) said the size of some packaged goods is smaller. Consequently, savvy consumers are purchasing more private-label and store-brand products, the survey found. More than three-quarters of respondents (75.3%) purchased lower-priced products, and nearly 2-in-5 respondents (39.6%) added more private-label products to their grocery bags.

Gas prices continue to take their toll on consumer behavior, as nearly 3-in-4 respondents (72.7%) are making fewer trips to the grocery store to save money, and more than two-fifths (40.8%) are purchasing fewer items overall.

"Higher prices, smaller package sizes and pain at the pump are driving consumers to buy lower-priced grocery items," said Pat Conroy, Deloitte vice chairman and the U.S. consumer products practice leader. "That’s why now, more than ever, it is important for consumer products companies to strengthen their customer relationships and distinguish value ahead of the competition."

Though consumers may be looking for the lowest-priced items when they shop for food, nutrition still matters. According to the Deloitte survey, more than 3-in-4 respondents (76.2%) said they more often want healthier food options when they shop, and nearly two-thirds (64.8%) agreed or somewhat agreed that food retailers are starting to sell more locally produced fruits and vegetables.

Additionally, nearly one-half of respondents (49.3%) agreed that packaging that displays a row of standardized icons called "nutrition keys" on the front of the package with standard ingredients listed on the back would be very helpful for purchasing decisions. The survey also found that more than half (51.1%) of food shoppers read the ingredients on unfamiliar food items.

When it comes to researching product information, shoppers are relying more on mobile devices, the survey found. More than one-third (34%) of smartphone users research food prices or product information while in a store, and more than two-fifths (43%) of smartphone users have managed a food shopping list on their device while not in a store.

Overall, more than one-half (53%) of shoppers surveyed are increasingly using technology to obtain information about food products, and more than one-quarter (28%) of respondents interacted with a food retailer via the retailer’s mobile application or website. Furthermore, more than one-fifth (23.5%) of survey respondents expected their smartphone-related grocery shopping activity to increase next year.

Traditional supermarkets remain the top choice for food shoppers, with 79.7% of those surveyed choosing to shop there. Large supercenters came in second, with 61% of respondents saying they shop there for food.

Outside of shopping at supermarkets and one-stop-shop supercenters, nearly one-third of consumers (32.6%) met their grocery needs by visiting a dollar store over the past year. The survey also found that more than 2-in-5 respondents (22%) bought food at a drug store, and slightly less than 1-in-20 shoppers (4.9%) visited an online retailer or food manufacturer to purchase food.

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