PHARMACY

Dr. Reddy’s launches Sumatriptan

BY Ryan Chavis

HYDERABAD, India — Dr. Reddy’s Labs announced that it has launched Sumatriptan Injection USP, Autoinjector System 6-mg/0.5-mL, a generic version of Imitrex STATdose Pen (sumatriptan succinate) 6-mg/0.5-mL. The drug is available in a carton containing 2 single-dose prefilled syringes.

Sumatriptan is used to treat acute migraine headaches with or without aura and acute cluster headaches in adults who have been diagnosed with migraine or cluster headaches, according to the company.

The Imitrex STATdose Pen brand, along with the generic had combined U.S. sales of approximately $169 million for the twelve months ending in December 2013, according to IMS Health.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

NACDS supports bill to curb Rx abuse, safeguard patients

BY Antoinette Alexander

ARLINGTON, Va. — U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee vice chair Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Rep. Tom Marino, R-Pa., have introduced legislation that would establish a work group to explore opportunities to reduce prescription drug abuse without compromising access to medications for patients who legitimately need them.

The National Association of Chain Drug Stores on Tuesday expressed its support for the new legislation — the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2013 (H.R. 4069).

“NACDS and chain pharmacy are committed to partnering with federal and state agencies, law enforcement personnel, policy-makers, and other stakeholders to work on viable strategies to simultaneously advance patient health and prevent prescription drug abuse,” stated NACDS president and CEO Steve Anderson.  “This legislation is an important step in addressing one of the most complex public health problems of our day.”

The workgroup would include equitable representation of healthcare and law enforcement entities up to 20 individuals. It would include representatives of the FDA, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, as well as organizations representing patients, pharmacy, prescribers, hospitals, wholesalers, state attorneys general, law enforcement officials, and others with expertise in this area.

“It makes perfect sense that problems like drug abuse and meeting patients’ needs merit the highest form of collaboration among experts in government and in the private sector, but the best of intentions do not always provide that.  We commend Reps. Marino and Blackburn for moving forward with this important concept,” Anderson added.

In its continued efforts to curb prescription drug abuse and diversion and ensure patient access to medications, NACDS has previously supported legislation introduced by U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer to collaboratively address the problem through collaboration with law enforcement and healthcare stakeholders.  

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Walgreens partners with UCSF Medical Center and School of Pharmacy on cutting-edge pharmacy

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — UC-San Francisco and Walgreens on Tuesday opened a Walgreens store on the UCSF campus that aims to improve medication safety, decrease healthcare costs and help patients use medicines more effectively by offering pharmacist-based patient care and expanded health-and-wellness services to the community. A joint effort among Walgreens, the UCSF School of Pharmacy and UCSF Medical Center, “Walgreens at UCSF” also will explore new models for improving overall patient care.

“’Walgreens at UCSF’ is an ideal environment for our pharmacists to work with UCSF Medical Center and School of Pharmacy faculty to further innovate in health care while providing greater access to services for the surrounding community,” said Joel Wright, Walgreens divisional VP specialty solutions group. “At Walgreens, we are very pleased to share and develop best practices with UCSF pharmacists and pharmacy students, which further our commitment to help people get, stay and live well.” 

“Modern medicine has transformed many diseases from urgent, life-threatening conditions into chronic illnesses that can be managed with the right medications, but that means more and more patients are juggling multiple prescriptions with complex instructions,” said Joseph Guglielmo, dean of the UCSF School of Pharmacy. “And, in many instances, this complicated medication list is inaccurate and incomplete. This collaboration aims to transform the practice of community pharmacies to enable pharmacists to do what they’re trained to do, which is help patients manage their health with the right medications and understand how to take them correctly.”

The collaboration builds upon Walgreens’ leadership in pioneering new approaches to pharmacy care, as well as UCSF’s long history of collaboration in teaching, research and patient care between the School of Pharmacy and UCSF Medical Center, which together piloted the first hospital-based clinical pharmacy program in the nation, in the 1960s.

The project comes at a time when an estimated 82% of Americans use daily medications to manage their health and 29% take five or more medications, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yet the National Consumers League reports that three of every four Americans say they do not always take their medications as directed, and an estimated one-third of all patients do not fill their prescriptions. The result is a high rate of both medication errors and readmissions to hospitals for patients whose illnesses could have been managed at home. 

“Every time a patient is readmitted to the hospital because they did not take their medications, it has a direct impact on both their health and their healthcare costs,” said Daniel Wandres, chief pharmacy officer of UCSF Medical Center. “By creating this three-way collaboration, we hope to create a national model for eliminating medication-related readmissions and reducing medication errors nationwide.”

The new pharmacy model also comes on the heels of the California provider status law based on Senate Bill 493, which took effect Jan. 1, 2014, expanding the role of pharmacists on the patient care team. Under the new bill, pharmacists can perform additional healthcare responsibilities within the realm of their expertise, such as furnishing certain medicines, monitoring patient health and adjusting prescriptions, as needed. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?