PHARMACY

Dr. Reddy’s launches generic Zegerid

BY David Salazar
HYDERABAD, India and PRINCETON, N.J. — Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories on Monday announced the launch of its generic Zegerid (omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate). 
 
The drug had U.S. sales of about $306.7 million for the 12 months ended May 2016, according to IMS Health. Dr. Reddy’s generic will be available in two dosage strengths: 20 mg omeprazole/1100 mg sodium bicarbonate and 40 mg omeprazole/1100 mg sodium bicarbonate. 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

FDA expands Prezista indication

BY David Salazar
SILVER SPRING, Md. — The Food and Drug Administration has approved a bew indication for Janssen Therapeutics’ Prezista (darunavir), the company announced Monday. Prezista, a treatment for HIV-1 in adults and children older than 3 years of age, can now be used by pregnant women with HIV. 
 
“Many HIV treatments have limited data available to support their use during pregnancy,” Janseen Therapeutics VP medica affairs Richard Nettles said. “This expansion of our label is an important advancement in addressing the needs of women living with HIV, and it demonstrates that Prezista is a safe and effective treatment for pregnant women living with this disease. We are proud to be able to provide an option for physicians and mothers who are trying to determine the best approach for HIV treatment.”
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Fruth Pharmacy on front lines of W. Va. flood relief efforts

BY David Salazar
Left to right: Barbara Taylor, Fruth Pharmacy OTC category manager; Lynne Fruth, president; Amy Nelson, gift category manager; and Tim Weber, VP pharmacy stand with boxes of donated supplies for flood relief on July 8. 
 
POINT PLEASANT, W. Va. — With her office at Fruth Pharmacy less than 200 yards from a river, the potential for flash floods like the ones that devastated West Virginia on June 23 is never too far from president Lynne Fruth’s mind. And though many of Fruth Pharmacy’s locations were spared the damage of flash floods, which damaged or destroyed 1,200 homes — though one location was damaged by runoff — the company’s associates, executives and business partners wasted no time coming to the aid of those affected. 
 
The company’s gift category manager Amy Nelson had locations set up donation boxes in the aftermath, and the company created a special UPC code for customers to donate money for supplies, an effort that raised more than $500,000. By July 1, donations were able to fill a box truck with donations including sanitary necessities, cleaning supplies and toys, with more left over for another trip, with a third trip following. 
 
“What’s meaningful to me is that when you talk about over $5,000, you’re talking about people with modest incomes saying ‘I don’t have a lot but I want to do something,’” Fruth told Drug Store News. “And I think that’s one of the great things about people in West Virginia — the generosity of people in small towns.”
 
In addition to donations from Fruth Pharmacy locations, business partner Heinrich Paper Supply donated a truck full of $4,000 worth of cleaning supplies, and OTC category Manager Barbara Taylor gathered first aid supplies to the Kanawha County Emergency Ambulance authority. The first aid kits were sent alongside hand sanitizer, and Fruth Pharmacy is sending 339 cases of OTC products to Scott Depot, W. Va. For first responders and volunteers to distribute to flood victims. 
 
Beyond providing necessities for flood victims, Fruth Pharmacy, through its VP pharmacy Tim Weber and supplier Genetco, donated thousands of dollars worth of antibiotics to the Kanawha-Charleston Humane Association, whose shelters took in hundreds of pets displaced by the floods that affected their owners. 
 
“We felt this was really significant for people who had lost their homes and family members, on top of the other things they're dealing with,” Fruth said. “If the beloved family pet could be rescued, cared for and hopefully reunited with the families, that would be a meaningful part of their healing.”
 
As the floodwaters have receded and the donation shipments have made their way to those affected by floods, Fruth said she anticipates the focus of donations to change and focus on back-to-school needs for kids whose families lost homes and, potentially jobs, as the businesses that employed them may no longer be around as a result of the floods. 
 
I know that there was a large box of children's books that came in with the toys, and it hit me that these schools and these communities, they probably lost all the books in their library,” Fruth, a former school teacher, said “So when you think about having to replace all those types of things, you just move from one pressing need to other things that people are going to need.”
 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?