HEALTH

Diabetic patients: Technology’s useful to communicate with docs, as long as it’s free

BY Allison Cerra

SAN FRANCISCO Patients with diabetes may seek information from their physicians outside of scheduled office visits but are not willing to pay for such services, according to a new study presented at the American Osteopathic Association’s 115th Osteopathic Medical Conference and Exposition.

Among 300 patients with diabetes, the study authors noted, 42% communicated with their physicians by telephone outside of scheduled office visits and 13% used e-mail. However, 62% of patients said they would not pay to communicate with their physicians outside of scheduled office visits.

“Patients want some way to communicate with their physicians, such as by phone or pager, to ask questions about managing their diabetes or to share information about their condition, such as their blood sugar levels,” said study co-author Jay Shubrook, an AOA board-certified osteopathic family physician from Athens, Ohio. “They like the access, but they don’t want to pay for it.”

The study also found older respondents, who averaged between ages 51 years and 60 years, did not use Twitter or Facebook to communicate with their physician. What’s more, only 69% of respondents had Internet access at home. This could be because older adults do not find paying for the Internet a priority compared with their other expenses, including those related to other medical conditions, Shubrook said.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Strativa enters license, supply agreement with Sobi

BY Alaric DeArment

WOODCLIFF LAKE, N.J. Strativa Pharmaceuticals is working with a Swedish drug maker to develop and commercialize a prescription vitamin supplement, Strativa said Tuesday.

 

The company said it had signed a license and supply agreement with Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, also known as Sobi, concerning European rights to Strativa’s Nascobal (cyanocobalamin), a vitamin B12 nasal spray.

 

 

The supplement is approved for treating vitamin B12 deficiency, designed as a once-weekly alternative to injections. Vitamin B12 deficiency usually results from pernicious anemia, a strict vegetarian diet and poor absorption of the nutrient resulting from such medical conditions as HIV infection, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis and gastrectomy.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

PerformRx receives PBM accreditation from URAC

BY Allison Cerra

PHILADELPHIA A full-service pharmacy benefit manager received its second accreditation from an independent, nonprofit healthcare-accrediting organization.

PerformRx said that its pharmacy benefit management accreditation from URAC indicated that PerformRx’s PBM business demonstrated a commitment to quality services. “This accreditation serves as a clear sign that PerformRx is committed to providing the best possible service to our existing and future customers,” said Mesfin Tegenu, PerformRx president. “The URAC evaluation is an incredibly rigorous process that evaluates the organization at all levels, and to wear the URAC seal is a mark of distinction for our company.”

In conjunction with its PBM accreditation, PerformRx also applied for URAC’s drug therapy management accreditation. PerformRx’s DTM program improves therapeutic outcomes for members by evaluating drug dose, method of delivery, cost effectiveness and other factors, the company said, adding that obtaining the DTM accreditation will allow PerformRx to demonstrate the high quality and effectiveness of its DTM program.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?