PHARMACY

Diabetic men clear for coffee consumption

BY Anna Mcgrath

NEW YORK Recent studies show no correlation between coffee consumption and risk of heart disease among diabetic men.

Prior to the research by Rob M. van Dam and his colleagues at Harvard School of Public Health, coffee consumption was believed to slow diabetic’s ability to process glucose. However, data from van Dam’s research contradict such findings, declaring that even more than four cups per day does not increase the risk of heart disease or probability of death.

“Our findings do not support the hypothesis that habitual caffeinated coffee consumption increases risk of cardiovascular events or mortality among individuals with Type 2 diabetes,” the authors conclude.

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Par ships first generic version of J&J drug

BY Alaric DeArment

WOODCLIFF LAKE, N.J. Par Pharmaceutical Cos. has begun shipping its generic version of a drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The company announced Tuesday the shipment of risperidone ODT in the 0.25-mg, 3-mg and 4-mg strengths. The drug is used in adults as a stand-alone treatment for schizophrenia and as a combination, with lithium or valproate, for the treatment of manic and mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder.

The drug is a generic version of Johnson & Johnson’s Risperdal M-TAB, which had sales of $89 million last year, according to IMS Health data. As the first company to file an approval application with a paragraph IV certification, Par has six months of market exclusivity, though J&J retains exclusivity for the use of the drug in children.

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FDA creates transparency taskforce

BY Alaric DeArment

ROCKVILLE, Md. After years of criticism, the Food and Drug Administration wants to take the tinting off its windows.

The agency announced Tuesday the creation of an internal transparency taskforce, headed by principal deputy commissioner Joshua Sharfstein, to find ways to make its decision making more transparent for the public while protecting confidentiality.

“Over the years, there have been complaints made about the FDA’s lack of transparency,” commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a conference call with reporters Tuesday morning.

Hamburg said the taskforce would take comments from the public and stakeholders to find ways to make information about agency operations, recall information, enforcement and other activities more accessible. The agency will convene a public meeting on June 24 and another one in the fall and accept public comment through a docket until Aug. 7.

“The recommendations of the taskforce will allow us to more effectively implement the agency’s public health mission,” Hamburg said.

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