News

Devices transform shelf

BY Michael Johnsen


The expansion of intimacy health devices at mass is transforming the intimacy health segment into some pretty significant profit centers. “The total vibrations category currently has up to $1 billion in retail sales with no clear branded leader,” Church & Dwight’s CEO James Craigie told analysts earlier this month, noting that a line of full-sized personal massagers under the Trojan banner has launched through all classes of trade. “This is a category of new white space for our Trojan brand to enter,” he said.


Awareness around the availability of intimacy health devices within pharmacies is only going to get greater. New-to-mass LELO featured a high-end line of Kegel exercisers earlier this year at NACDS Marketplace — a product line that may represent the proverbial “next-step” in the evolution of intimacy health centers. The Laselle Kegel exercisers under the Intimina by LELO brand aren’t only a corrective solution for such conditions as incontinence; they’re also preventive.


The Laselle launch is expected to help drive awareness among women older than 55 years. And it’s that demographic that represents the strongest opportunity.


“The rise of sexually transmitted infections in that age group [both men and women] is growing disproportionate to the population,” noted Carol Carrozza, VP global marketing of sexual health and well-being at Ansell Healthcare Products. “It’s [a demographic] that we’re focusing on in our marketing efforts to provide education.”

 

 The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Intimacy Health Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

ScriptPro unveils compact dispensing technology

BY Alaric DeArment

MISSION, Kan. — Often smaller, less busy stores don’t have space for large robotic dispensing machines.


Enter ScriptPro. The Mission, Kan.-based pharmacy technology provider is unveiling its new Compact Robotic System at the National Association of Chain Drug Stores’ Pharmacy and Technology Conference in Boston. The CRS is designed for small and medium-sized pharmacies whose space limitations would make larger systems impractical.


“It uses the same dispensing technology [and] the same user interface, look and feel as our larger systems,” ScriptPro president and CEO Mike Coughlin told Drug Store News. “It’s really just a matter of moving robotics technology down to the middle and lower end of the bell curve of volume.”


Another new product from ScriptPro is the Third Party Management System, a software application that allows pharmacies to evaluate and track the performance of contracts from such third parties as payers and wholesalers. TPMS also will help pharmacies to more efficiently and profitably participate in the government’s 340B program, whereby healthcare institutions buy drugs at deeply discounted rates to provide to needy patients.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

M&A: Multitudinous and ample

BY Alaric DeArment

The final outcome of the battle between Israel’s Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and Canada’s Valeant Pharmaceuticals International to buy Cephalon serves as a good illustration of why it helps to have a plan B.


In May, Teva beat out Valeant’s $5.7 billion offer to buy Frazier, Pa.-based Cephalon with a $6.8 billion offer of its own, acquiring Cephalon’s hefty pipeline in the process. And last month, Teva bought Taiyo Pharmaceutical Industry, Japan’s third-largest generics company, for $934 million.


It’s been some time since an acquisition on the scale of Pfizer’s purchase of Wyeth has occurred, but there still are plenty of mergers and acquisitions to go around. 


Valeant has gone ahead with other acquisitions in order to position itself as a leading skin care company. At the end of June, it bought the rights to Elidel (pimecrolimus) and Xerese (acyclovir and hydrocortisone), treatments for eczema and cold sores, respectively, from Sweden’s Meda for $76 million up front. Last month, it spent $425 million to buy Dermik, Sanofi’s skin care business. Shortly thereafter, it bought Ortho Dermatologics, Johnson & Johnson’s skin care subsidiary, for $345 million.


In June, Endo Pharmaceuticals bought American Medical Systems, a device manufacturer focused on male and female pelvic health, for $2.9 billion. Then, last month, Bristol-Myers Squibb purchased San Diego-based Amira Pharmaceuticals, which makes drugs for inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, for $325 million up front. Also last month, Perrigo, a manufacturer of generic prescription and OTC drugs, closed its acquisition of Paddock Labs, a company that makes similar products, for $540 million. The Federal Trade Commission required Perrigo to divest a small handful of Paddock’s drugs, which it would sell to Watson Pharmaceuticals.


Pfizer — which earlier this year plunked down $3.6 billion to buy King Pharmaceuticals, a Bristol, Tenn.-based company specializing in pain drugs — announced last month it would buy Icagen, another developer of pain drugs in which Pfizer already owned an 11% stake, for $56 million.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?