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Degree Women, sports broadcaster Erin Andrews celebrate strong women

BY Antoinette Alexander

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, N.J. — Sports broadcaster Erin Andrews has partnered with Unilever’s Degree Women deodorant to celebrate "Unapologetically Strong" women who aren’t afraid to test their limits and push boundaries.

Andrews will share her Unapologetically Strong story on Facebook and encourage others to accomplish their own personal triumphs.

"I’m always pushing myself to take things to the next level in both my career and personal life. When the going gets tough, I rely on Degree Women Clinical Protection with MotionSense. It provides three times the protection of other deodorants and doesn’t let me down," Andrews said.

Women can visit Degree Women on Facebook for a chance to win $5,000 to support their own Unapologetically Strong journey, and check out advice, tips and daily inspiration from Andrews and Degree.
 

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Study: Professional-effect products fueling nail care growth at mass

BY Antoinette Alexander

ROCKVILLE, Md. — Dollar sales of nail care products in the mass market will reach $2 billion in 2016, according to "The Nail Care Market in the U.S.," a recent report from market research firm Packaged Facts.

A continuous flow of innovative technologies and products designed to empower women to imitate nail salon effects simply and cost-effectively on their own has been a driving force in the growth of the nail care category, according to Packaged Facts publisher David Sprinkle.

For example, do-it-yourself products mimicking the salon effects of Minx nails — adhesive nail stickers made in a range of wild colors and patterns that are available only in salons — have had a major influence on the expansion of the DIY nail care market.

Another breakthrough has been the introduction of products allowing consumers to apply their own gel manicures at home. A salon gel manicure lasts twice as long as a traditional manicure but can cost $50 and up at a salon.

Products enabling DIYers to create textured nails, such as crackle nail polish, have also contributed to the explosive growth of the nail care category. Magnetic nail polish, a newer entry in the field, is increasingly seen as offering stiff competition to crackle nail polish. Glitter nail polish provides another way to make nails stand out.

Along with this continuing flood of innovative nail care products, a combination of trends create conditions favorable to market growth. These include an increase in the number of frequent users of DIY nail care products; the overlap between women who use professional nail care services and women who make frequent use of DIY nail care products; and rapid growth in the population of multicultural women, who are much more likely than non-Hispanic white women to be frequent nail care product users, the study stated.
 

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Study: Retail health clinics, urgent care centers a $10B market and growing

BY Antoinette Alexander

TAMPA, Fla. — The retail health clinic and urgent care center market currently is worth about $10 billion and is poised for strong growth in the coming years as the shortage of primary care physicians and crowded emergency rooms increasingly move patients to retail sites, according to new data by Marketdata Enterprises, an independent market research publisher.

Marketdata Enterprises has released the new 132-page report entitled, “The Market For Retail Health Clinics & Urgent Care Centers.” The study explores the nature of the business; industry size and growth; demand factors; patient demographics; effects of the recession and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; operating ratios; major competitors and more.

“The primary care MD shortage is getting worse and consumers with less insurance are increasingly using retail health clinics for kids’ physicals, flu shots, ear infections, sore throats and minor ailments. Soon, they’ll be using these clinics for diabetes monitoring, weight-loss programs and more,” research director John LaRosa said.

Major findings included:

  • Marketdata estimates that retail clinics, now numbering about 1,400, will nearly double to 2,700 sites by 2016;

  • Average revenues per clinic are $512,000. Urgent care centers account for $9.23 billion and retail centers for $786 million — for a total of $10.08 billion;

  • 
Marketdata estimates that 9,000 urgent care clinics’ revenues will hit $9.23 billion this year, and rise to $14.16 billion by 2016; and

  • The number of yearly patient visits to retail clinics exploded, from 1.48 million in 2007 to 5.97 million in 2009, and an estimated 10.5 million by year-end 2012.

The investment needed to open a retail clinic in a drug store chain, supermarket or big box retailer is about $250,000, and to open a stand-alone urgent care center with on-site X-ray machines and other equipment is $750,000 to $1 million, according to the research.
            

New retail clinics less than two years old may have 10 to 15 patients/day, at an average fee of $60 to $75, while “established” clinics will see 25 to 30 patients/day. Visits spike during the fall flu season, the study stated.
            

Half of urgent care centers are owned by physician groups and another 28% by hospitals, which are setting up their own centers separate from emergency rooms.

More consumers are using retail clinics and urgent care centers as their first point of entry to the healthcare system, and 32 million more will enter in 2014 when the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is in effect. Primary care physicians and emergency rooms won’t be able to handle the increased volume, the study stated.
        

Private equity firms are keen to invest in this niche healthcare sector, and several companies such as Doctor’s Express are already franchising.
            

Adding weight-loss programs to their repertoire could push retail clinics from break-even to profitability. It’s a natural fit, since dieters want drop-in anytime convenience, low price, and personal attention. Partnerships are certain to multiply over the next few years.

“Retail health clinics will provide a boon for nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants, who are well qualified to treat minor ailments. Plus, it’s a great way to learn the business aspects of medicine. Healthcare is becoming more decentralized, being delivered where consumers shop and work — not just in the doctor’s office and not just 9-5, M-F, and at less cost,” LaRosa said.


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M.JOSEPH says:
Sep-27-2013 08:30 am

It’s a true fact that the primary care MD shortage is getting worse and consumers with less insurance are increasingly using retail health clinics for kids’ physicals, flu shots, ear infections etc. Health industries need some change in their insurance policies. Thank for share.

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