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CVS Health’s latest mobile pay solution integrates payment, refills and loyalty card

BY Michael Johnsen

WOONSOCKET, R.I. – CVS Health on Thursday announced the launch of CVS Pay, a new, end-to-end mobile payment solution.

CVS Pay – now part of the CVS Pharmacy mobile app – integrates payment, prescription pickup and the ExtraCare loyalty program all in one quick scan at checkout.  

"Over the past year, our digital team has brought to market numerous new digital tools – like CVS Pay – that make shopping at CVS Pharmacy easier and more convenient," stated Brian Tilzer, SVP and chief digital officer, CVS Health. "We've been excited by the level of customer adoption of these digital solutions and we will continue our quick pace of innovation and deployment to make our customers' health care experience even easier."

Customers can now use their CVS Pharmacy mobile app to streamline their checkout experience at the store – combining multiple steps into one easy scan. For customers picking up a prescription, CVS Pay offers a simple, private and end-to-end pharmacy experience.  Customers will have the ability to refill, manage multiple prescriptions and get alerts when prescriptions are ready, all within the app – and then pick up and pay using a single barcode. Customers can also link their ExtraCare card with CVS Pay, meaning a single scan at checkout will process all ExtraCare deals, earn new rewards and handle payment for the transaction.

CVS Pay is currently available in select markets, including New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware and a nationwide rollout is expected to kick off later this year.  The solution is available on iOS and Android devices – the same platforms the CVS Pharmacy app is available on today – and works with all major credit (MasterCard, Visa, Discover, American Express), debit, Health Savings Account and Flexible Spending Account cards.

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Study: Self-service checkouts encourage theft

BY Gina Acosta

LEICESTER, England — Self-service checkouts promote theft by eliminating human contact throughout the shopping process, especially during the critical payment stage, according to a new study.

In an analysis of retailers in the United States, Britain and other European countries, Professors Adrian Beck and Matt Hopkins of the University of Leicester in England said their research shows that self-service checkouts might generate retail losses/problems in four ways:

  • theft through malicious non-scanning of goods
  • non-malicious loss through non-scan/scanning errors
  • physical and verbal abuse against staff generated via audit checks or system errors
  • transaction frauds/fraudulent use of payment wallets

The scholars noted that in a self-service checkout environment, the sense of risk perception or control is reduced as all elements of the customer journey can be completed without human interaction.

"It gives offenders ‘ready-made excuses’ for non-scanning behavior – the self-scan defense. Giving customers the freedom to self-scan gives them the opportunity to blame faulty technology, problems with the product barcodes or claim that they are not technically proficient as reasons for non-scanning," the professors wrote in their report. "Proving intent is difficult where customer nonscanning is identified and deciding whether prosecutions can be made or not is potentially a legal and customer relations minefield."

Other key findings of the research include:

• Mobile scan and payment is at an early stage of development across most retailers. At present, the focus is mainly on developing a mobile scan option only rather than one that also enables payments to be made via an app (a mobile wallet option).

• There is some evidence that customer appetite for self-scanning is limited. Indeed, there was a suggestion that in some locations and for some demographics the move to self-scan might represent a cultural shift that could be slow to be adopted.

• The potential benefits for customers are thought to be numerous. Not only could self-scan make shopping easier and quicker – through the elimination of the need to use traditional checkouts – it can also offer ways to personalize the shopping experience. This can be done by offering consumers the opportunity to create shopping lists, view their purchase history, receive information on real time store offers, have access to store maps and product searching functionality, and receive and use electronic vouchers, all through an app on their mobile device. 

The study examined 1 million shopping trips. Nearly 850,000 were found not to have been scanned, the report said, making up 4% of the total value of the purchases.

To read the full report, click here.

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