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Cub Foods launches nutrition information program in stores

BY Allison Cerra

MINNEAPOLIS Cub Foods announced the launch of Nutrition iQ, a unique nutrition information program designed to help consumers make better-informed, better-for-you food choices right at the grocery store shelf.

Nutrition iQ was developed in collaboration with Joslin Clinic, part of an academic medical center affiliated with Boston’s Harvard Medical School. The Nutrition iQ program is available in the 73 Cub Foods stores located in Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois.

The Nutrition iQ program comes as research shows that consumers are having difficulty making sense of nutrition guidelines and are looking for an easier way to make informed food choices for better health. For example, approximately three-in-five consumers think diet and nutrition are very important, yet more than half say they need practical tips to help them eat right and 41% don’t know or understand nutrition guidelines, according to the American Dietetic Association.

The Nutrition iQ program uses easy-to-see, color-coded shelf tags – hung just below an item’s price tag – to help consumers quickly identify healthier food choices for themselves and their families.

“Cub Foods is committed to helping its customers lead healthy lifestyles. With more than 60,000 items on our grocery store shelves, it can take considerable time to read and compare nutrition labels. The Nutrition iQ program provides a convenient way for consumers to evaluate food choices on the spot as they shop,” said Chuck Lynch, SVP operations at Cub Foods.

“Poor food choices contribute to many health problems, including obesity and heart disease,” said Nora Saul, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., nutrition services manager, Joslin Clinic. “We’re pleased to have been able to contribute our nutritional expertise to a program that offers people a way to make healthy eating choices.”

Cub Foods is the second of Supervalu’s nationwide family of grocery stores to receive the Nutrition iQ program, which initially launched in January 2009 at the company’s Albertsons banner. Preliminary data from Albertsons suggest that the program has helped steer consumers to purchase better-for-you foods. Supervalu will roll out the program to its other stores, including Acme in Philadelphia, bigg’s in Cincinnati, Farm Fresh in Virginia, Hornbacher’s in Fargo, Jewel-Osco in Chicago, Shaw’s/Star Market in New England, Shop ‘n Save in St. Louis and Shoppers Food & Pharmacy in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, this year.

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

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NCPA announces new FSA service

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK There are a number of conclusions you can glean from the NCPA’s announcement, which runs counter to a Senate proposal to remove over-the-counter medicines as reimbursable expenses under flexible spending accounts/health savings accounts as a way to help pay for healthcare reform.

 

For example, Finpago helped quantify the value of that FSA customer. If the average pharmacy sells more than $60,000 per year in OTC products under an FSA plan, then industry wide, that means retail pharmacy captures some  $3.3 billion in FSA-related sales per year.

 

 

Pair that sales figure with the fact that 14.8% of American households have an FSA account (National Center for Health Statistics) and you get 16.5 million families saving pre-tax income dollars on some $3.3 billion in sales across more than 55,000 retail pharmacy outlets. That’s a burgeoning market of some consequence. And it’s a health benefit that has been utilized at greater rates thanks both to the inclusion of OTCs and the convenience of FSA debit cards.

 

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Washington, Mo., government votes to move PSE products to Rx-only

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON, Mo. Retailers and suppliers are again facing disparate legislation around the sale of pseudoephedrine products as more state (and now local) governments consider switching PSE products to prescription-only from their current behind-the-counter status.

Local city council for Washington, Mo., in Franklin County last week voted that PSE products can only be sold by prescription within city limits by a vote of six in favor and two opposed.

The motion was passed following a brief presentation by Sgt. Jason Grellner, commander of the Franklin County Narcotics Enforcement Unit, and Andrew Zupan, a pediatrician in favor of the switch.

The state of California is considering similar legislation; Senate bill No. 484 passed through the Senate last month but failed to pass out of an Assembly Public Safety committee as amended on June 30, though the committee will be revisiting the piece of legislation.

According to published reports, the American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern Missouri is considering legal action if the city ordinance is not repealed. “It sets a dangerous precedent,” Tony Rothert, legal director for the Missouri chapter of the ACLU told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Monday. “Here it’s just allergies, but next time it could be something more, like birth control.”

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