HEALTH

Chronic disease, cost of care expected to drive use of home-health technology

BY Michael Johnsen

BOULDER, Colo. — Consumers utilizing home-health technologies will increase from 14.3 million worldwide in 2014 to 78.5 million by 2020, according to a new report from Tractica released Monday. The market intelligence firm anticipates that medical monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment will be the largest application market during that timeframe, and will drive the deployment of a wide variety of connected health devices and software applications. Other key segments of this market are remote consultations, eldercare and health-and-wellness.
 
Home-health technologies are emerging as a distinct segment within the larger mobile and digital health market. The ability to remotely monitor patients with chronic conditions, utilize technology for improved eldercare, and conduct virtual physician consultations (eVisits) is being seen as a way to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the overall healthcare system, as well as to improve patient outcomes. Meanwhile, home health devices and applications are leveraging the ubiquity of residential broadband networking and smartphones to help consumers manage health and wellness on an ongoing basis.
 
“Key factors driving interest in home healthcare technologies include rising healthcare costs, aging populations and a rise in the number of people living with chronic diseases,” said principal analyst Charul Vyas. “However, significant challenges remain for the industry to solve, including regulatory issues, data security and privacy and technology interoperability and integration issues.”
 
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IMS Health to introduce a consumer version of its health app ratings app

BY Michael Johnsen

 
 
CLEVELAND – IMS Health is getting ready to launch a consumer version of its professionally-geared AppScript app in May, MedCityNews reported earlier this week
 
Currently, AppScript enables doctors to rate and “prescribe” mobile apps for their patients, MedCityNews noted. "Very early research suggests about half of the patients who get prescribed apps through AppScript will use them beyond the first month," MedCityNews reported citing IMS Health. 
 
But now AppScript will be available "without a prescription," so to speak, allowing consumers to identify and download appropriate health apps to help them manage their conditions based on those doctor's ratings. 
 
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CRN urges consumers to heed FDA warning on Tri-Methyl Xtreme

BY Michael Johnsen

SILVER SPRING, Md. – The U.S. Food and Drug administration earlier this week warned consumers to stop using a dietary supplement for muscle growth linked to serious liver injury.
 
Tri-Methyl Xtreme, distributed by Las Vegas-based Extreme Products Group, claims to contain anabolic steroids and is sold on the Internet and in some retail stores and gyms.
 
An investigation is underway by the FDA to identify the product’s manufacturer after the agency received adverse event reports from consumers — one each from California, New Jersey and Utah. The agency has not received reports of death from use of the product.
 
“We urge consumers to take seriously FDA’s consumer advisory urging people not to use a product for muscle growth that the agency has indicated is linked to serious liver injury. According to the agency, Tri-Methyl Xtreme, distributed by Las Vegas-based Extreme Products Group, claims to contain anabolic steroids, not permitted to be sold in a dietary supplement, making it an adulterated product," stated Steve Mister, president and CEO of the Council for Responsible Nutrition. "Clearly, products like these create a problem — for consumers, and for responsible industry — and our association is continuing to seek ways to support FDA to get these products off the market. At the very least, more robust and more frequent inspections of manufacturers under the existing good manufacturing practices regulations is required."
 
“Products marketed as supplements that contain anabolic steroids pose a real danger to consumers,” stated Charles Lee, a senior medical advisor in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Office of Compliance. “Anabolic steroids may have a range of serious adverse effects on many organ systems, and the damage may be irreversible.”
 
Liver injury is generally known to be a possible outcome of using products that contain synthetic anabolic steroids, and steroid-like substances.  In general, anabolic steroids may cause other serious long-term consequences, including adverse effects on cholesterol levels; increased risk of heart attack and stroke; masculinization of women; shrinkage of the testicles; breast enlargement; infertility in males; and short stature in children.
 
 
 
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