HEALTH

CHPA to Hoosier State: E-tracking will curb PSE sales

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Consumer Healthcare Products Association is slated to testify Wednesday before an Indiana legislative committee on how the state can improve its policies for preventing the illegal diversion of pseudoephedrine.

The Indiana State Legislature’s Criminal Law and Sentencing Policy Study Committee will hear a range of policy options, from requiring a prescription for currently accessible medicines to implementing an electronic tracking system to block illegal sales of PSE.

“The residents of Indiana deserve a solution that will help fight the state’s meth problem, without placing additional burdens on individuals, families and the state,” stated Mandy Hagan, director of state government relations for CHPA. “Electronic tracking is the only system that blocks illegal PSE sales while maintaining consumer access to the safe and effective medications they rely on for colds and allergies.”

In Indiana, there currently is no mechanism in place to curb the practice of “smurfing,” when criminals move from store to store to purchase illegal amounts of PSE to be used in the production of meth.

E-tracking, which has been adopted by 12 states nationwide and is funded by members of CHPA, will afford local law enforcement officials an investigative tool to track and prevent meth production across state lines. The system also preserves Indianans’ over-the-counter access to the PSE medications.

According to a poll by David Binder Research, almost two-thirds of surveyed Indiana voters oppose making common cold and allergy medications containing PSE available by prescription only, and 82% agree that an Rx-only requirement would create an “unnecessary burden” for law-abiding citizens.

The Indiana State Retail Association also supports implementation of an electronic tracking system.

The survey, conducted from Jan. 14 to 24, involved 368 Indiana state residents ages 18 years or over, all of whom voted in the last election, and has a margin of error of +/-5.1%. The survey was sponsored by CHPA.

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AstraZeneca promotes healthy lifestyles with Crestor

BY Alaric DeArment

WILMINGTON, Del. With September marked as National Cholesterol Education Month, drug maker AstraZeneca is using the occasion to push lifestyles that promote low cholesterol, the Anglo-Swedish company said.

 

AstraZeneca, which markets the cholesterol-lowering drug Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium), is pushing such habits as a healthy diet and exercise as ways to keep cholesterol down. According to the American Heart Association, 102 million Americans ages 20 years and older have borderline-high or high cholesterol.

 

 

“The patient-doctor partnership is one of the most critical relationships you can have, and National Cholesterol Education Month can be a reminder to see your doctor, talk about your cholesterol numbers and target goal, and understand how to assess your cardiovascular risk,” physician and founder of the Texas-based Legacy Heart Center Waenard Miller said in a statement on behalf of AstraZeneca.

 

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Former MinuteClinic exec shifts to Santa Rosa Community Health Centers

BY Antoinette Alexander

SANTA ROSA, Calif. Former MinuteClinic regional medical director Francisco Trilla has joined Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, according to local news reports.

Trilla will serve as the new chief medical officer of Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, overseeing clinical programs at all of its eight facilities with "an emphasis on access and quality," according to reports.

Trilla most recently worked at Beth Israel Deacones Medical Center. He also was chair of the licensing committee for the Massachusetts’ Board of Registration Medicine and was the medical director of Atreva Health Care. In addition, he served as regional medical director of MinuteClinic and an assistant clinical professor at Harvard Medical School.

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