BEAUTY CARE

Charcoal helps boost Bioré’s sales

BY DSN STAFF

CINCINNATI — Drug stores have always faced challenges keeping up with prestige competitors when it comes to ingredient stories. With trained sales experts at the counter, department and specialty stores have an advantage in pitching the latest “magical” formula.

(To view the full Category Review, click here.)

That all changed when Bioré embraced the benefits of charcoal for its complexion care lineup. The result has been successful for the mass market, buyers said. Bioré features charcoal in several items, including a Pore Penetrating Charcoal Bar, Deep Pore Charcoal Cleanser and Deep Cleaning Charcoal Pore Strips. While overall facial cleanser sales are edging up an average 4% this year compared with last year, Kao’s Bioré brand is posting average 35% gains, according to IRI.

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Retailers embrace ‘New General Market’

BY DSN STAFF

This past year goes into the books as the year drug and discount retailers fully embraced the concept of the New General Market. Realizing consumers think and shop differently — especially multicultural and millennial shoppers — retailers revamped signage and selections to meet these new demands.

(To view the full Category Review, click here.)

By doing so, they gained a competitive edge against department and specialty stores who have been slower to do so, according to industry expert Allan Mottus.

The beauty department arguably is the biggest category getting overhauled, especially hair and skin care. Research suggests women shop for beauty by needs rather than ethnicity. Validation of that point comes from a May 2015 report from Sundial revealing that more than 50% of women select products for skin or hair types, or beauty need. Only 7% indicated they selected products based on race.

Compounding that is the blending of America. “Moms walk into my salon with offspring hair they don’t know how to care for, such as an Asian mom with straight hair who didn’t know how to care for her daughter’s curls she inherited from her Jewish dad,” explained Cozy Fried man, who owns kid-friendly salons in Manhattan and has launched a line of hair care for kids.

As part of this movement, signage is being changed in stores, eliminating such terms as “ethnic hair care,” which were the norm for the past 30 years. In non-beauty categories, delineation between boys and girls is being eliminated. With the use of social media, retailers said they could direct messages to specific market segments, but allow them to shop how they want in stores.

“Women with thick, curly hair aren’t limited to one race,” said Richelieu Dennis, founder and CEO of Sundial Brands, adding that almost 100 million women in the United States alone claim to have textured hair. Dennis defined the New General Market as “an amalgamation of cultures, ethnicities and demographics aligned against commonalities, need states and lifestyles.”

A similar situation exists in skin care. While skin lighteners or products to address hyper-pigmentation often are thought of as purchase by black consumers, the reality is these situations exist among all women, said a buyer for a major drug chain.

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Mining personal grooming routine data

BY DSN STAFF

It’s 7 a.m.; do you know where your customers are? According to a report on global beauty routines conducted by analytics company RealityMine, that’s the peak time for personal grooming.

(To view the full Category Review, click here.)

And that’s not all consumers are doing. Activities in conjunction with personal grooming in most countries include relaxing, eating a meal and accomplishing household chores. Consumers also are multi-tasking by watching TV or checking mobile devices. While most people across the globe — 80% — are on their own during their beauty routine, people in Mexico like to use products together.

RealityMine gleaned its results from a comprehensive analysis of beauty routines using panelists from the United States, Australia, France, Mexico and Russia. The findings yielded relevant information for marketers and retailers trying to understand how to maximize efforts to reach consumers around the world. With Euromonitor reporting that men spend an average of 28 minutes per day on beauty routines, and women 42 minutes, it is crucial to understand the context of when and how they do it, suggested Alice Sylvester, chief growth officer at RealityMine.

“We think understanding the element of timing is one of the most important facts a marketer can use today,” she added. And it isn’t just when they are undergoing their rituals, but also the mindset they are in. The information can be used for effective marketing messages. “People like to see themselves in communications,” she said. And with many companies expanding internationally, the data helps illuminate cultural nuances.

There’s good news for beauty companies. Based on the data, people of all nations have mostly positive emotions when engaged in grooming. Digging deeper into data, moods slump later in the day. That could be a good time for a beauty company to “own” that time by delivering an uplifting thought or suggestion to elevate the mood — anything from recommending reapplying lip color to freshening up perfume.

It isn’t a one size fits all world, noted Sylvester, who said understanding different habits can help companies target for each country.

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