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CDC study reports drop in lower-limb amputations among diabetes patients

BY Allison Cerra

ATLANTA — Leg and foot amputations among patients diagnosed with diabetes saw a dramatic decline between 1996 and 2008, thanks to improvements in blood-sugar control, foot care and diabetes management, along with declines in cardiovascular disease, according to a new study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The study — “Declining Rates of Hospitalization for Nontraumatic Lower-Extremity Amputation in the Diabetic Population Aged 40 years or Older: U.S., 1988-2008” — which is published in the current online issue of Diabetes Care, found that the rate of leg and foot amputations declined by 65% between 1996 and 2008 among U.S. adults ages 40 years and older.

Comparing gender and race demographics, the researchers also discovered that among diabetes patients in 2008, men had higher age-adjusted rates of leg and foot amputations than women (6 per 1,000 versus 1.9 per 1,000), and African-Americans had higher rates than whites (4.9 per 1,000 versus 2.9 per 1,000). What’s more, adults ages 75 years and older recorded the highest rate — 6.2 per 1,000 — compared with other age groups.

The researchers analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey on nontraumatic lower-limb amputations and from the National Health Interview Survey on the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes from 1988 to 2008. Researchers found that the decrease in lower-limb amputation rates was greater among people with diagnosed diabetes, compared with those without diabetes. However, the rate in 2008 was still about eight times higher among people with diagnosed diabetes, compared with those without it.

“The significant drop in rates of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes is certainly encouraging, but more work is needed to reduce the disparities among certain populations,” said Nilka Ríos Burrows, an epidemiologist with CDC′s Division of Diabetes Translation and co-author of the study. “We must continue to increase awareness of the devastating health complications of diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of lower-limb amputations in the United States.”


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Fred Meyer installs Canon large-format photo printers

BY Allison Cerra

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y. — More than 130 Canon ImagePrograf iPF6300 large-format photo printers now are in operation at digital photo centers in Fred Meyer stores in the Northwest, Canon announced Wednesday.

The printers are designed so that consumers can print high-quality, poster-sized print collages of memorable moments.

“We are constantly trying to provide our customers with more options for their favorite photos and prints,” Fred Meyer VP photo, electronics and music Karen Hughes said. “We’re pleased to partner with Canon to give customers poster-sized prints of their treasured photos.”

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Hy-Vee launches mobile shopping app

BY Alaric DeArment

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa — Hy-Vee has introduced a mobile application that it said could make locating pie crust in its stores as easy as saying "pie."

The supermarket chain announced the release of the app, which allows customers to locate products, browse ads, search for recipes, build shopping lists, shop and interact with the company through social media. The app is built on the AT&T Mobile Enterprise Applications Platform and uses Taqtile Mobility’s Shingle solution.

"We decided to jump into the social media conversation and make our stores easier to navigate by developing an app that helps you find the foods you’re looking for faster and even tweet about what’s missing on our shelves," Hy-Vee assistant VP media relations Ruth Comer said. "This app gives us another way to communicate with customers and fulfill our mission of making lives easier, healthier and happier."

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