HEALTH

CDC: Seven states still experiencing moderate ILI activity

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — It appears this year’s flu season will officially wind down toward the beginning of March. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday reported a decline in influenza activity, though nationwide it’s still above the national baseline. 

No states reported high influenza like illness activity, the CDC noted, and seven states experienced moderate ILI activity (Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, New Mexico, Texas and Virginia).

Sixteen states and New York City experienced low ILI activity and 27 states experienced minimal ILI activity.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Hyland’s launches pair of mucus relief items

BY Michael Johnsen

LOS ANGELES — Hyland’s recently added three line extensions to its portfolio of cough-cold products — both an adult and pediatric mucus expectorant and a nighttime option for toddlers. Mucus relief accounts for 14% of the cough-cold category, Hyland’s reported, citing Nielsen data for the 52 weeks ended Jan. 18 across all channels. 

Hyland’s Defend Cold + Mucus temporarily relieves symptoms of colds, including accumulation of mucus in chest, throat and nose, cough with expectoration of mucus and relief from runny nose, sneezing and nasal congestion. Hyland’s also introduced a pediatric version — Hyland’s 4 Kids Cold ‘n Mucus. 

For babies, Hyland’s launched its Hyland’s Baby Nighttime Tiny Cold Syrup. The remedy represents a natural relief of common cold symptoms especially at night, including runny nose, congestion and occasional sleeplessness in babies as young as 6 months. 

 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Long-term daily multivitamin use may lower cataract risk in men

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — Long-term daily multivitamin use may lower cataract risk in men, according to a study of nearly 15,000 male physicians published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Past observational studies have indicated a relationship between nutritional supplement use and eye health. However, randomized trial data on the effects of long-term multivitamin supplement use and risk of eye diseases are limited and, in some cases, non-existent. To address this, researchers based at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School as part of the Physicians’ Health Study II (PHS II) conducted a randomized, double-blind study from 1997 to 2011 of 14,641 U.S. male doctors age 50 and older. 

Half took a common daily multivitamin, as well as vitamin C, vitamin E and beta carotene supplements. The other half took a placebo. The researchers followed the participants to identify how many participants in each group developed new cases of two common eye diseases: cataract, which is a clouding of the eye’s lens, and age-related macular degeneration, the deterioration of the eye’s macula that is responsible for the ability to see fine details clearly.

The researchers found that in the placebo group 945 cases of cataract developed, which were self-reported and confirmed by medical records, while

Only 872 cases of cataract developed in the multivitamin group, representing a 9% decrease in risk. This risk was even lower, at 13%, for nuclear cataract, which occurs at the center of the lens and is the most common variety of cataract associated with the aging process. Given that an estimated 10 million adults in the United States have impaired vision due to cataract, even a modest reduction in risk of cataract has potential to improve public health outcomes.

"If multivitamins really do reduce the risk of cataract, even by a modest 10%, this rather small reduction would nonetheless have a large public health impact," stated William Christen, the study’s lead author and researcher from Harvard Medical School.

In terms of AMD risk, the researchers found there were 152 new cases of visually significant (best corrected visual acuity of 20/30 or worse) AMD in the multivitamin group compared to 129 in the placebo group, but the difference was not statistically significant. While this finding may seem to contradict results of other studies, such as Age-Related Eye Disease Study, the researchers noted that the studies had different nutrient supplements, dosing and objectives. AREDS included daily zinc and a high-dose antioxidant combination of vitamin E, vitamin C and beta carotene, whereas the multivitamin in PHS II included these nutrients and many others.

All the nutrients were provided to the PHSII participants at the U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowance dose levels, which are much lower than the AREDS supplements. Furthermore, the objective in AREDS was to prevent AMD progression among persons who already had the disease, whereas the objective of PHS II was to prevent new cases of AMD, and thus persons with a diagnosis of AMD at baseline were not included.

 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?