PHARMACY

CDC: Retail settings become popular alternative for flu shots

BY Allison Cerra

ATLANTA — Many adults across the United States opted to visit their local drug store or supermarket to receive their flu shot during the 2010-2011 influenza season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report."

Although most adults received their flu vaccination at a doctor’s office (39.8%), the CDC found that retail settings, including supermarkets and drug stores, were used by 18.4% of adults. This compared with the 1998-1999 and 2006-2007 influenza seasons, when 5% and 7% of adults, respectively, were vaccinated in stores, the CDC said. The agency partly attributed the increase in retail setting use to changes in state laws allowing pharmacists to administer influenza vaccinations to adults and, subsequently, more pharmacies offering influenza vaccinations.

The third most common place where adults were vaccinated during the 2010-2011 season was at their place of work.

The CDC said that the report was comprised in order to provide a baseline for places where adults received their influenza vaccination since the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended individuals ages 6 months and older should be immunized, as well as to help vaccination providers plan for the 2011-2012 influenza season.

The CDC analyzed information on influenza vaccination among adults ages 18 years and older from 46 states and the District of Columbia during the 2010-2011 season. Data were collected from January to March 2011 by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the CDC noted.

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M.JONES says:
Jun-20-2011 05:55 am

This was always a great idea, but unfortunately all of these retail operations do not use good sterile technique. They work from card tables, don't disinfect the tables and do not wear or change gloves between patients.

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Nipro, NeuroMetrix collaborate to market NC-stat DPNCheck

BY Allison Cerra

WALTHAM, Mass. — Nipro Diagnostics and NeuroMetrix have teamed up to market a point-of-care test that is designed to evaluate such systemic neuropathies as diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Nipro and NeuroMetrix said the NC-stat DPNCheck test, developed by NeuroMetrix, could offer a cost-effective approach to detecting and monitoring DPN, which affects more than half of people with diabetes and could lead to such conditions as foot ulcers and limb amputation.

The companies currently are evaluating opportunities for the NC-stat DPNCheck in retail medical clinics.

Nipro and NeuroMetrix are slated to debut the test at the annual conference of the American Diabetes Association, which will be held from June 24 to 28.

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Liraglutide may prompt optimal blood-glucose levels in Type 1 diabetics

BY Allison Cerra

BUFFALO, N.Y. — A popular Type 2 diabetes treatment may help Type 1 diabetics achieve control of their blood-glucose levels, according to a small, observational study conducted at the University of Buffalo.

The study examined 14 adult Type 1 diabetics on insulin and added injectable Type 2 diabetes medication liraglutide to their medication regimen for periods ranging from one week to 24 weeks. Although all of the Type 1 diabetes patients had optimal blood-glucose levels at the beginning of the study, lead author Paresh Dandona, professor of medicine at the University of Buffalo’s School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, said that some patients experience "glycemic excursions," in which blood-glucose measures reach hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic levels.

Dandona and colleagues found, however, that within one to two days of beginning treatment with liraglutide, such glycemic excursions were offset but reversed just as quickly when treatment was discontinued, revealing that liraglutide likely was responsible for these effects and could be an effective add-on therapy to insulin.

"The addition of liraglutide to insulin therapy in these well-controlled Type 1 diabetics resulted in a significant and rapid reduction in glycemic excursions and, as a consequence, a rapid reduction in the amount of insulin they needed to take," Dandona said. "We will be investigating in detail the hypothesis that it is liraglutide’s ability to suppress glucagon that significantly reduces the wide swings in blood glucose levels that Type 1 diabetics — even those with very good glucose control — live with everyday."

The research has been published online ahead of print in the European Journal of Endocrinology. It also was recently presented at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston.

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