HEALTH

CDC launches second series of impactful ‘quit smoking’ ads

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — Continuing with the success of last year’s national education ad campaign, "Tips from Former Smokers," a second series of ads was launched Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

"This campaign is saving lives and saving dollars by giving people the facts about smoking in an easy-to-understand way that encourages quitting," stated Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. "This campaign is effective. The increase in calls to quitlines after last year’s campaign shows that more people are trying to quit smoking as a result of these ads."

Smoking harms nearly every organ in the body, the CDC noted. A "tip" from Bill, the ad participant with diabetes: "Make a list. Put the people you love at the top. Put down your eyes, your legs, your kidneys and your heart. Now cross off all the things you’re OK with losing because you’d rather smoke."

The ads, funded by the Affordable Care Act’s Prevention and Public Health Fund, feature stories of former smokers living with smoking-related diseases and disabilities. Beginning Monday, ads will run for at least 12 weeks on television, radio and billboards, online, and in theaters, magazines and newspapers nationwide.

The ads that ran last year had immediate and strong impact. Compared with the same 12-week period in 2011, overall call volume to 1-800-QUIT-NOW more than doubled during the Tips campaign, and visits to the campaign website for quit help increased by more than five times, the CDC reported.

The messages in the new ads are emotional, telling the story of how real people’s lives were changed forever due to their smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke. The ads feature smoking-related health conditions — including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD, more severe adult asthma, and complications from diabetes, such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and amputation — and candidly describe the losses from smoking and the gains from quitting. 

Despite the known dangers of tobacco use, nearly 1-in-5 adults in the United States still smoke. Almost 90% of smokers started before they were 18, and many of them experience life-changing health effects at a relatively early age. 

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Homeopathy association honors Sen. Tom Harkin

BY Michael Johnsen

MILWAUKIE, Ore. — The American Association of Homeopathic Pharmacists on Wednesday honored Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, with an award of appreciation for introducing and supporting legislation that safeguards Americans’ right to choose complementary health care. Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Harkin has been a longtime supporter of patient access to homeopathic medicines, AAHP noted. 

"We value the senator’s passion for improving people’s health and holding down healthcare costs through healthier living," stated Mark Land, president of AAHP. "The AAHP and its members deeply appreciate the senator’s support of homeopathic medicines as a healthcare choice."

In photo: AAHP’s J.P. Borneman and Mark Land honor Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa

"Throughout my career in Congress, I have been pleased to work closely with AAHP representatives to ensure that my constituents and all Americans continue to enjoy access to a wide range of personalized homeopathic medicines," Harkin wrote in a March 4 letter congratulating the members of AAHP on their 90th anniversary. 

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Soho Flordis International launches Calorease diet aid

BY Michael Johnsen

SYDNEY, Australia — Soho Flordis International recently launched Calorease, formulated with a patented fat binder called FBCx, into the U.S. market. 

The dietary fiber used by Calorease, binds up to nine times its weight in fat from food, safely removing it from the body before it can be absorbed. Taken with each meal, Calorease can reduce dietary fat by up to 15,000 calories per month without the restrictions of a low fat diet. 

FBCx is a natural nondigestible molecule derived from corn. The fiber forms a bond with fat molecules, and then removes them from the body before they can be absorbed. Typical dietary fibers bind to dietary fat at an approximate 1:1 ratio. This small ratio makes common dietary fibers impractical as a weight-loss aid; one would have to consume excessive amounts of typical fiber to have any effect. With Calorease, FBCx binds to fat molecules at a ratio of 9:1. 

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