BEAUTY CARE

Burt’s Bees Baby establishes its first DTC digital channel powered by Demandware Commerce

BY Antoinette Alexander

BURLINGTON, Mass. — Demandware, a provider of on-demand e-commerce, has announced that Burt’s Bees Baby, a specialty brand featuring natural, organic products for babies and moms, has launched a new e-commerce site, BurtsBeesBaby.com, on the Demandware Commerce platform. The new site represents the company’s first direct-to-consumer channel and will be followed by a mobile site, also powered by Demandware, in the coming months.

 “Our goal is to become the No. 1 organic baby brand in the world, and our new direct-to-consumer site is a major step toward making this a reality,” stated Michelle Visser, CEO of Burt’s Bees Baby. “With Demandware, we have a robust commerce platform that enables us to execute our merchandising strategies quickly and easily and will scale to support our company’s growth. We’re confident that with Demandware we have found a true partner who is as committed to our success as we are.”

Burt’s Bees Baby is a trademark of Burt’s Bees Licensing, used under the license Ayablu. Burt’s Bees is a manufacturer of natural health and beauty care products.

Items currently include apparel, bath linens, gift sets and accessories, with bedding to be added this coming July. The retailer also has plans to expand across the baby, home and lifestyle categories to include gear, playtime, furniture and seasonal items. Features such as a guided search, a baby registry, ratings and reviews, a store locator and integration with social media help consumers find and evaluate products quickly and easily.

 

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Campaigners celebrate as EU set to ban animal testing for cosmetics

BY Antoinette Alexander

LONDON — A ban on importing and selling animal-tested cosmetics products and ingredients will enter into force in March. The ban affects all cosmetics, including toiletries and beauty products.

"I believe that the ban should enter into force in March 2013 as Parliament and Council already have decided. I therefore am not planning to propose a postponement or derogation to the ban," Commissioner Tonio Borg wrote in a recent letter to animal testing campaigners.

After more than 20 years of campaigning, beauty retailer The Body Shop, who will not be affected by the ban as it has always been against animal testing, and nonprofit organization Cruelty Free International are celebrating the end to animal testing for cosmetics in Europe. This means that from March 11 onward, anyone who wishes to sell new cosmetic products and ingredients in the EU must not test them on animals anywhere in the world, the groups stated.

To celebrate the victory, The Body Shop and Cruelty Free International stated that they are launching a range of special commemorative activities in the countdown to March 11.

The groups stated that the proposed ban sends a strong message worldwide in support of cruelty-free beauty, and to particular countries such as China, who still demand animal testing for cosmetics, to also respond and ban testing on animals.

"This is truly an historic event and the culmination of more than 20 years of campaigning. Now we will apply our determination and vision on a global stage to ensure that the rest of the world follows this lead,” stated Cruelty Free International CEO Michelle Thew.

In 1991, the BUAV — founder of Cruelty Free International — established a European coalition of leading animal protection organizations across Europe, or ECEAE, with the objective to end the use of animal testing for cosmetics. This set in motion a high-profile public and political campaign across Europe spanning more than 20 years. In 1993, The Body Shop, the first beauty company to take action on animal testing for cosmetics, supported the campaign by enlisting the support of its consumers across Europe. Three years later in 1996, Dame Anita Roddick, founder of The Body Shop, joined members of the ECEAE and MEPs in presenting a petition containing 4 million signatures to the European Commission.

In 2012, the BUAV established Cruelty Free International, the first global organization dedicated to ending cosmetics animal testing worldwide. The Body Shop, together with Cruelty Free International, launched a new international campaign, which has so far resulted in customers from 55 countries signing a global pledge supporting an end to animal testing for cosmetics forever.

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Mintel: Moms, young women show highest usage of at-home nail care

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Moms and young women helped fuel sales of at-home nail care products, according to the latest research by Mintel.

Women in households with children are more likely to use most nail care products than those without children in their homes, according to the latest research by Mintel. This is particularly notable with nail art accessories where 24% of women with children report usage compared with 11% in households without children.

Moms are an important consumer group that might be tight on time and lack the extra income to spend at a spa but are still looking to treat themselves to some fashion-forward beauty. Furthermore, 79% of those with children use colored nail polish versus 65% without children, and 22% of respondents with children report using artificial nails as opposed to 9% without children, the study found.

“The beauty industry generally benefits when consumers have higher levels of disposable income; however, the nail care industry has experienced strong growth in recent years, despite the weak economy,” stated Shannon Romanowski, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel. “Nail polish offers women an affordable way to experiment with new colors and stay current with fashion trends, often for less than $10 a bottle. The affordability of nail polish, combined with new products and colors, makes nail care a reasonable splurge for lower- to middle-income women.”


Young women also are helping to drive the nail care segment. Use of colored nail polish is highest among women ages 18 years to 24 years, with 85% reporting usage compared with 71% of total female respondents. Younger women also show elevated use of nail art (33% versus 16% of all respondents), artificial nails (23% versus 14% of all respondents), and gel nail polish (14% versus 10% of all respondents).

“Nail care users younger than 35 years are significantly more likely than their older counterparts to view wearing nail polish as a way to express their personality and follow fashion trends. Meanwhile, those between 35 years and 44 years feel that painting their nails is a way to pamper themselves and take a moment of ‘me time’ in their busy schedules,” added Shannon Romanowski.


Expense plays a large role in why women do their nails at home, but it is not the only issue. Just over half (54%) of women say they would get their nails done more often at a salon, but it’s too expensive; however, some 27% are concerned about health and safety issues at salons and 18% think getting their nails done in a salon simply takes too much time.

Nail care also may have a season. Not surprisingly, the sunshine and warmth sees a lot more painted nails as 58% of women say they polish their toenails more and 31% polish their fingernails more in the summer months.

The nail color and care market in the United States grew by 72% since 2007, with sales estimated at $2.5 billion at the end of 2012. Growth is expected to continue through 2017, albeit at a slower pace than previous years, with sales expected to reach just over $4 billion, according to Mintel.

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