HEALTH

British beauty company launches online campaign filled with fabulous prizes

BY Antoinette Alexander

LONDON, U.K. Beauty retailer Boots has announced the launch of an online campaign that features beauty competitions and a chance to win such prizes as front row seats to a show at London Fashion Week or a makeover with “10 Years Younger” presenter Nicky Hambleton-Jones.

In addition to inspirational competitions, the beauty event, found at www.boots.com, also includes access to beauty advice and tips from such experts as hairdresser James Brown, a friend and hair stylist to Kate Moss.

In addition, the site has its own beauty editor, Katie Campbell, previously deputy beauty editor at Grazia. Campbell will be writing a daily beauty blog on new product launches, product previews, etc.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Study suggests pediatric use of acetaminophen can lead to asthma

BY Michael Johnsen

LONDON The journal Lancet on Friday announced a large study covering children in 31 countries has found that use of acetaminophen in children in the first year may be at higher risk for developing asthma.

The study consisted of parent-provided reports of 205,000 children and found that acetaminophen use in the first year of life was associated with a 46 percent higher risk of asthma by age six, as compared to children who were not given acetaminophen in the first year.

The findings will be published in the Sept. 20 issue of the journal.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Research examines cognitive changes from nicotine withdrawal

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO New research highlighted at a symposium during an annual meeting for family physicians shows how nicotine withdrawal creates functional changes in the brains of smokers trying to quit causing cognitive performance deficits, such as an ability to concentrate, that may make it more difficult to quit, and could be a driver of smoking relapse.

Further, brain imaging technology shows that when treatment with the Commit 4 mg nicotine lozenge is introduced, these symptoms of nicotine withdrawal can be reversed, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare announced Thursday.

“The new research provides powerful new evidence as to why physicians need to intervene and help their patients understand and manage symptoms to help them quit successfully,” stated C. Everett Koop, former U.S. Surgeon General and driving force behind the 1988 Surgeon General’s report entitled: The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. “Physicians should use these new data as reasons to speak with their patients to help them better understand their addiction, including the serious impact of withdrawal and how proven treatments can help reverse nicotine withdrawal symptoms that impact the brain.”

Specific areas in the brain, particularly those associated with executive functioning, are impacted during nicotine withdrawal. The Commit 4 mg nicotine lozenge significantly improved cognitive performance compared to placebo and lessened symptoms of withdrawal including craving, difficulty concentrating, irritability and restlessness. Other nicotine withdrawal symptoms including short-term memory deficit, and selective and divided attention deficits were also significantly reduced.

“In withdrawal, a smoker’s brain is literally in dysfunction and this can impair the quitter’s ability to think and act,” statetd Jack Henningfield, professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Vice President of Research and Health Policy at Pinney Associates and consultant to GlaxoSmithKline. “Research on the brain in withdrawal is important as it helps physicians and smokers trying to quit recognize and manage the symptoms. For smokers who experience withdrawal and can’t afford lapse in concentration or judgement, FDA-approved medicines for smoking cessation such as the Commit 4 mg nicotine lozenge may make the difference between success and failure in their smoking cessation efforts.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?