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BioRx receives distribution rights to bleeding disorder drug

BY Alaric DeArment

CINCINNATI — Days after its acquisition of Coagulife, specialty pharmacy provider BioRx has received limited distribution rights to a treatment for a bleeding disorder described as one of the rarest in the world.

The company, which specializes in treating bleeding disorders, said Wednesday that it had received the rights for Corifact (factor XIII concentrate [human]), a treatment made by CSL Behring for congenital Factor XIII deficiency. The drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in February 2011.

"We are very excited to begin serving the factor XIII patient population," BioRx co-founder Eric Hill said. "We are also pleased to expand our distribution partnership with CSL Behring in the bleeding disorders market."


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Injectable filler technology inspires new Redermic [C] by La Roche-Posay

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK —  Skin care company La Roche-Posay has developed the new Redermic [C], an anti-wrinkle firming moisturizer that was inspired by the growing popularity of injectable filler technology.

When treating skin-aging concerns, dermatologists implement a variety of procedures, treatments and ingredients. Influenced by minimally invasive hyaluronic acid filler injectables, La Roche-Posay incorporates fragmented hyaluronic acid. This smaller molecule size (versus other topical hyaluronic acid molecules) allows for better diffusion to help visibly plump the skin, the company stated.

Dermatologists also incorporate such collagen-building treatments as prescription-strength retinoids and antioxidant ingredients, like vitamins A, C and E. Redermic [C] contains 5% pure vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant known for its ability to help synthesize collagen and even minimize the appearance of wrinkles. Finally, the product includes mannose, a sugar molecule that smoothes the skin’s surface and evens tone by optimizing the interaction of skin and light.

“Aesthetic procedures have become one of the fastest-growing areas of dermatology, because more women want to look and feel younger with the added benefits of lower costs and shorter recovery time,” stated Dr. Dina Anderson. “Redermic [C] is an effective adjunct to use in conjunction with many minimally invasive procedures, like fillers, as a way to continue combating wrinkles over time.”

Redermic [C] has an ultra-rich, melt-in texture that leaves a nongreasy finish. Noncomedogenic, paraben-free, fragrance-free, dermatologist-tested and safe for sensitive and dry skin, it can be used in the morning and night on the face and neck.

Redermic [C] from La Roche-Posay has a suggested retail price of $53.95 for normal/combination, $53.95 for dry, $53.95 for UV and $43.95 for eyes. The line will be offered beginning in September at select physicians’ offices and select CVS/pharmacy, Ulta, Walgreens and Duane Reade locations.

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NCPA posts PBM satire featuring fictional PBM rep ‘Phil Mypockets’

BY Michael Johnsen

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The National Community Pharmacists Association on Wednesday posted a video and website satirizing pharmacy benefit managers at WhoRunsMyDrugPlan.com.

“Too many plan sponsors, policy-makers and patients remain unaware of how large pharmacy benefit managers affect their prescription drug benefit and their healthcare premiums,” stated NCPA CEO Douglas Hoey. “For too long, the PBM industry has benefitted from a lack of oversight and regulation, which has eroded the value of the prescription drug benefit to consumers. We have seen prescription drug costs rise, insurance premiums and patient co-payments increase, higher PBM profits and diminished patient choice — while reimbursement to pharmacy small business owners for providing prescription drug services continues to decline. It’s fair to ask: Where’s the money going?”

WhoRunsMyDrugPlan.com answers the basic question, “What is a PBM?” and explains cost-inflating PBM practices under such titles as “Spread Pricing,” “Rebate Pumping,” “Restricting Patient Choice,” “Mail Order False Economics” and “Mail Order Is Not For Everyone.” The site also provides a “take action” page for patients and health plan sponsors, as well as a resources page linking to other websites, including those of consumer advocates that have expressed similar concerns with PBMs.

“These new online resources are intended to help enable plan sponsors, policy-makers and patients to further examine these issues and to insist on meaningful reforms,” Hoey added. “Simply put, the outdated drug benefit business model of today should be replaced with health plan designs that are aligned to the interests of payers and patients, while properly utilizing pharmacists to reduce costs and improve health outcomes.”


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