News

Bidlingmaier named director, global sales and marketing at Avery Dennison

BY Michael Johnsen

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. Avery Dennison RFID, a UHF inlay manufacturer and RFID technology provider, last week promoted Maggie Bidlingmaier to director, global sales and marketing.

“Avery Dennison RFID has experienced significant sales growth,” stated Jack Farrell, vice president and general manager of Avery Dennison RFID. “Maggie will build on our strong performance and industry leading inlay product portfolio to expand our presence globally as RFID technology and the industry move into a new business cycle where customers are investing in RFID because a proven return on investment has been established.”

Most recently, Bidlingmaier was responsible for sales and marketing efforts in Europe.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

New studies reveal childhood vaccine costs are variable in private sector

BY Antoinette Alexander

ANN ARBOR, Mich. The high cost of some childhood vaccines is putting a significant financial strain on some physicians, according to research from the University of Michigan Health System. However, that burden could equate to an increase in business for retail-based clinics as some physicians may eventually opt to no longer provide all vaccines or may delay the purchase of some vaccines for financial reasons.

A pair of new studies from the University of Michigan Health System found that many physicians appear to be paying too much and receiving too little reimbursement for childhood vaccines.

The survey is of 1,280 U.S. pediatricians and family physicians engaged in direct patient care. Of the pediatricians, 70 percent responded, along with 60 percent of family physicians. They study of costs and reimbursements included data from 76 practices.

With vaccines for children enrolled in Medicaid funded by the public sector through the federal Vaccines for Children Program, prices are negotiated annually with vaccine manufacturers by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the data from the new studies support the belief that costs and reimbursements are widely variable in private practices.

“Until now, nobody knew what anyone was paying,” stated lead author Gary L. Freed, M.D., MPH, chief of the division of general pediatrics and director of the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit at the U-M Health System’s Mott Children’s Hospital. “This information will change the way in which physicians negotiate prices.” The studies appear in the December issue of the journal Pediatrics.

The studies found that the price-per-dose of one brand of hepatitis B vaccine, for example, ranged from $4.26 to $13.06 at different medical practices. Reimbursements of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine ranged from $16.77 to $59.02. Many physicians in the survey expressed dissatisfaction with the price and reimbursement levels of vaccines.

While few physicians in the survey indicated that they had considered no longer providing all vaccines to privately insured children (11 percent overall; 5 percent of pediatricians and 21 percent of family physicians), about half of them reported that they had delayed the purchase of some vaccines for financial reasons and experienced a decline in profit margins from immunizations.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Dismal economy stalks November sales as Walgreens closes out a bleak month

BY Jim Frederick

DEERFIELD, Ill. In a sure sign of the downward economic spiral plaguing the nation’s retailers, Walgreen Co. reported a nearly one-percent decline in same-store sales for the month of November.

Overall sales edged up 3.7 percent for the month over the same period last year, to $4.96 billion. But sales in stores open more than a year fell 0.9 percent. Comparable-store front-end and pharmacy sales also slid 0.9 percent, Walgreens announced today.

Black Friday and the following weekend saw stronger consumer traffic than a year ago, according to the company, but fewer items were purchased per transaction. Transactions in comparable stores rose 1.7 percent in November.

Pharmacy sales for the month were up an anemic 2.4 percent on a total-store basis, pulled down both by sagging consumer activity and by the increasing use of lower-priced generic drugs over their brand-name counterparts. Comp-store pharmacy sales, according to Walgreens, “were negatively impacted by 2.3 percentage points due to generic drug introductions in the last 12 months.”

The company also blamed a shift in the calendar for the comp-store decline in pharmacy business, “as pharmacy patients fill more prescriptions during the week than on weekends.

“This year, November had two fewer weekdays compared to November 2007,” Walgreens reported. “Calendar shifts, along with one less holiday shopping week in November this year, negatively impacted total comparable store sales by 2.5 percentage points, front-end sales by 0.8 percentage points, comparable pharmacy sales by 3.4 percentage points and prescriptions filled in comparable stores by 3.3 percentage points.”

The bad news extended to total prescriptions filled, which decreased 3.4 percent on a comp-store basis in November over the same period last year. The shift of Zyrtec from prescription to over-the-counter status was another factor in that decline.

Pharmacy sales accounted for 64.4 percent of total sales for the month, according to the chain.

Walgreens said strong sales of basic necessities, consumables and key beauty items gave some lift to front-end revenues, as did Zyrtec’s switch to OTC status.

“Consumers continued to shop our stores for the essentials throughout the holiday weekend,” explained Walgreens president and chief operating officer Greg Wasson. In a hopeful note, he added, “As we approach the last-minute Christmas rush, shoppers will take even greater advantage of our wide selection of products and convenient locations.”

Walgreens opened 94 stores in November, including 15 relocations, and acquired eight stores. As of Nov. 30, the chain operated 7,123 locations in 49 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. That includes 6,630 drug stores—an increase of 491 stores over a year ago—as well as worksite health centers, home care facilities and specialty, institutional and mail service pharmacies.

The company’s Take Care Health Systems subsidiary manages 293 walk-in clinics at Walgreens drug stores. That figure doesn’t include franchisees of Option Care, Inc., a wholly owned Walgreens subsidiary.

On Monday, Walgreens also announced it had completed its purchase of McKesson Corp.’s specialty pharmacy operations, adding to its fast-growing specialty division.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?