HEALTH

Bendich, Johnson receive ‘CRN Apple’ for nutrition trailblazing

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Monday announced that GlaxoSmithKline’s Adrianne Bendich and Byron Johnson of Amway/Nutrilite were awarded the “CRN (Steuben) Apple” at CRN’s annual symposium this weekend.

Bendich is the clinical director, medical affairs at Glaxo and is a recognized authority in women’s health issues involving nutrition. Bendich has been the point person for the GSK research team that provided calcium and vitamin D to the Women’s Health Initiative.  In addition to serving on the editorial board of The Journal of Nutrition, the Journal of Women’s Health and the Journal of Nutrition and Immunology, Bendich is the only person to serve continuously as a dietary supplement industry reviewer for the National Institute of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements annual bibliography since its inception. Bendich has authored more than 150 scientific articles in peer reviewed journals, and has edited over a dozen books for nutrition professionals.  

Johnson is the nutrition regulatory policy director for Amway/Nutrilite, where he first began his career more than 25 years ago.  Previously, he has served as the nutrition and wellness industry relations director for the company, as well as vice president and general counsel. In his current position, Johnson is responsible for regulatory and corporate compliance matters, as well as trade association participation pertaining to food and dietary supplement policy. Earlier this year, Johnson was elected the chairman of the International Alliance of Food/Dietary Supplement Associations, where he has been an active participant in the organization’s regulatory, scientific and advocacy affairs since its inception in 1998. Johnson served as the chairman of CRN from 2003-2004, and currently remains an active member on the CRN board.  

The award, considered CRN’s highest honor, is given to individuals who have demonstrated long-term commitment and outstanding service to CRN and the dietary supplement industry. 

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Data shows use of Alli could also impact household members’ habits

BY Jenna Duncan

PHOENIX and PITTSBURGH New data released during proceedings at this year’s Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society said that people taking FDA-approved weight-loss pill Alli also tend to make healthier grocery shopping decisions, a trend that is positively influencing families.

A 26-week study reviewed the shopping habits of 15,156 households in which one or more members were taking Alli. The study showed that shoppers in these households were also purchasing items such as cereals, diet control bars, multi-vitamins and yogurt, among other “healthy” options.

Study co-author, Rebecca Reeves, of Baylor College of Medicine, said, “What is so unique and exciting about the data in this abstract is the evidence that people taking Alli made changes in their purchase patterns toward healthier foods. These data show that households purchasing Alli more than once increased their buying of healthier products compared to the previous year.”

The National Institutes of Health have reported that about 65 percent of U.S. adults are obese or overweight. Persons dealing with too much weight are more likely to face health problems such as heart disease, hypertension and type 2 diabetes, the National Institutes said.

Taking Alli, combined with a low-calorie, encourages healthy, modest weight-loss, maker GlaxoSmithKline has said.

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Nicotine gum helps pregnant women decrease amount of smoking, research says

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON Although nicotine gum does not necessarily increase quit rates among pregnant women, the non-prescription smoking cessation product does help reduce the amount of smoking to the point that use of nicotine gum increased birth weight and gestational age, two key parameters in predicting neonatal wellbeing, new research published last week in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology has found.

The study tracked pregnant women who smoked daily and received individualized behavioral counseling and random assignment to a 6-week treatment with 2-mg nicotine gum or placebo followed by a 6-week taper period. Women who did not quit smoking were instructed to reduce the number of cigarettes smoked by substituting with gum.

Using a completer analysis, nicotine gum significantly reduced the number of cigarettes smoked per day and cotinine concentration. Birth weights were significantly greater with nicotine gum compared with placebo. Gestational age was also greater with nicotine-replacement therapy than with placebo, the research found.

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