HEALTH

An apple a day keeps kidney stones away, study concludes

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON Researchers revealed last week another reason to eat well: A healthy diet helps prevent kidney stones. Loading up on fruits, vegetables, nuts, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, while limiting salt, red and processed meats, and sweetened beverages, is an effective way to ward off kidney stones, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology.

Because kidney stones are linked to higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, increased body weight, and other risk factors for heart disease, the findings have considerable health implications, authors stated.

Investigators collected information from individuals enrolled in three clinical studies: the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (45,821 men followed for 18 years), the Nurses’ Health Study I (94,108 older women followed for 18 years), and the Nurses’ Health Study II (101,837 younger women followed for 14 years). Eric Taylor of Main Medical Center and lead researcher assigned a score to each participant based on eight components of a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) style diet: high intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy products, and whole grains and low intake of salt, sweetened beverages, and red and processed meats. Individuals with higher DASH scores consumed diets that were higher in calcium, potassium, magnesium, oxalate, and vitamin C and lower in sodium.

A total of 5,645 incident kidney stones developed in the participants in the three studies. In each study, participants with the highest DASH scores were between 40% and 45% less likely to develop kidney stones than participants with the lowest DASH scores. The reductions in kidney stone risk were independent of age, body size, fluid intake and other factors.

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Study: Stomach bugs increase risk of IBD

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Diarrheal disease may increase a person’s risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease, according to a study published in Gastroenterology.

IBD refers to a group of conditions, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, marked by chronic inflammation in the intestines, leading to such symptoms as abdominal pain and diarrhea.

Henrik Nielsen, M.D., from Aarhaus University Hospital in Aalborg, Denmark, and colleagues reported in the latest issue of the journal that over the course of 7.5 years, IBD was diagnosed for the first time in far more gastroenteritis patients 1.2% of patients were diagnosed with IBD, compared with 0.5% of healthy control subjects.

Nielsen and colleagues compared the risks of IBD between 13,148 patients with documented gastroenteritis caused by salmonella or campylobacter and 26,216 uninfected controls.

Stomach bug patients had nearly a threefold increased risk of developing IBD over the entire study period, and nearly a twofold increased risk in the first year after infection.

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Advanced Vision Research founder dies

BY Michael Johnsen

WOBURN, Mass. Jeffrey Gilbard, 55, founder of Advanced Vision Research, died Aug. 12 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston from complications related to a bicycle accident.

Gilbard was best known for his pioneering research around dry eye disease, a condition caused by a chronic lack of moisture in the eye. He also is considered one of the first ophthalmologists and researchers to understand the correlation between nutrition and the health and wellness of the eye.

“Jeff Gilbard was an innovative, gifted ophthalmologist and researcher, who made several important contributions to our profession,” stated Edward Holland, director of Cornea Service at the Cincinnati Eye Institute. “He was the first person to understand the importance of tear film osmolarity and his development of hypotonic artificial tears containing bicarbonate and potassium is a landmark event in the treatment of dry eye disease. Dr. Gilbard was on the forefront of the treatment of ocular disease and nutritional supplements. Dr. Gilbard’s legacy will be the scientific papers he authored, the revolutionary products he developed to help patients with ocular surface and retinal disease and most notably the people whose lives he’ll continue to improve.”

“Our company is grieving the loss of its founder and our close friend, Dr. Jeffrey Gilbard,” stated Leigh Reynolds, Advanced Vision Research COO. “Over the past 12 years, I have worked closely with [Gilbard] to build AVR. Jeff’s vision for AVR to make products to prevent suffering due to dry eye and other eye diseases was very clear. We will continue his mission of improving people’s quality of life. This is what [Gilbard] would want us to do and there’s no better tribute to him than to continue his work.”

“[Gilbard] was blessed with extraordinary intellect and dedication,” commented Neil Donnenfeld, SVP global sales and marketing. “He combined the two and made a significant difference in the world. He had no greater satisfaction than to hear that one of AVR’s products helped a dry-eye sufferer — and he heard that frequently. His legacy will live on through the relief that dry-eye sufferers receive when they use one of his products. We have lost a giant of a man.”

Gilbard founded Advanced Vision Research in 1995 to market and distribute TheraTears, an over-the-counter eye drop for dry eye. TheraTears quickly became one of the best-selling eye lubricants on the market. His holistic approach to eye care included the use of nutritional supplements to improve the ocular surface and to treat and prevent retinal disease. This research resulted in additional products including TheraTears Nutrition, Macutrition and NutriDox.

The AVR executive team will led by COO Reynolds, who will continue to run the company. Donnenfeld and Ruth Webb, controller, will continue in their respective capacities.Born Feb. 19, 1954 and raised in Roslyn, N.Y., he was the son of a self-educated New York business entrepreneur Harris Gilbard and mother Frances Gilbard. He attended Brown University, receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree, Magna Cum Laude in 1975. He received his medical degree in 1979 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He was an Intern in Internal Medicine at Stanford University Medical Center and served his Ophthalmology residency at Harvard Medical School in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He remained at Harvard as a Heed Fellow in Cornea. He was a clinical assistant professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Dry Eye and Ocular Surface Disease Clinic at the New England Eye Center in Boston.

Dr. Jeffrey Gilbard is survived by his beloved wife of 19 years, Liz and his three children, who he adored and nurtured. He also leaves behind his twin brother Dr. Steven M. Gilbard, his older brother Dr. Robert J. Gilbard. A memorial service will take place on Monday at 11:00 am at Temple Shir Tikva, 141 Boston Post Road, Wayland, Mass.

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