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Ahold USA taps Canadian retailer to lead U.S. merchandising

BY Michael Johnsen
CARLISLE, Pa. – Ahold USA on Tuesday announced that Andrew Iacobucci has been appointed to EVP merchandising effective April 11. 
 
“We are delighted that Andrew is joining our team, and he brings outstanding merchandising experience to help us on our journey from good to great,” stated James McCann, COO, Ahold USA.
 
In this role, Iacobucci will focus on leading a merchandising team that supports Ahold USA and its four retail divisions, Stop & Shop New England, Stop & Shop New York Metro, Giant Landover and Giant Carlisle.
 
Iacobucci brings an extensive background in the supermarket industry to his new role with Ahold USA, including a mix of merchandising, P&L ownership and retail strategy experience. In the last ten years, he has held several leadership positions at Loblaw Companies Limited, the largest food retailer in Canada. Most recently, Iacobucci was president of the Discount Division, a $17 billion business.
 
Before that, he held senior leadership roles in Loblaw’s Grocery Discount Division, Drugstore Business Unit, Central Store Operations team, Superstores team and Corporate Development function. Prior to his time at Loblaw, Iacobucci spent several years at Monitor Group, a global strategy consulting firm where he focused on U.S. retail.
 
With a bachelor’s degree in economics from Queens University in Ontario and a law degree from the University of Toronto, Iacobucci is relocating to the United States from Canada.
 
 
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Fitbit device used to inform ER treatment

BY Michael Johnsen

 

WASHINGTON – Emergency physicians used a patient's personal activity tracker and smartphone to identify the time his heart arrhythmia started, which allowed them to treat his new-onset atrial fibrillation with electrical cardioversion and discharge him home. It's the first case report using information in an activity tracker/smartphone system to assist in medical decision-making and was reported online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine
 
"Using the patient's activity tracker – in this case, a Fitbit – we were able to pinpoint exactly when the patient's normal heart rate of 70 jumped up to 190," said corresponding study author Alfred Sacchetti, a doctor with Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J. "The device told us that the patient's atrial fibrillation was present for only a few hours. That was well within the 48-hour window needed to consider him for rhythm conversion, so we cardioverted him and sent him home."
 
A 42-year-old patient with a history of seizures but no history of cardiac disease or prior episodes of atrial fibrillation came to the emergency department following a seizure. He had an irregular heart rate ranging between 130 and 190 beats per minute. He was medicated with oxcarbazepine and diltiazem. His heart rate returned to normal (between 80 and 100 beats per minute) but the atrial fibrillation remained.
 
The treatment of recent onset atrial fibrillation is electrical cardioversion in any patient who can reliably relate an arrhythmia onset time of within the previous 48 hours. Because the patient was asymptomatic during his current episode of atrial fibrillation, it was not possible to assign an onset time for his arrhythmia.
 
Emergency department staff accessed the smartphone application connected with his activity tracker and discovered the onset time for his atrial fibrillation was 3 hours prior to coming to the emergency department. After cardioverting the sedated patient, emergency department staff interrogated the smartphone app again, which accurately recorded the change in heart rate consistent with a rhythm change from atrial fibrillation to normal rhythm. The patient was discharged home with instructions to follow up with outpatient cardiology.
 
"Not all activity trackers measure heart rates, but this is the function of most value to medical providers," Sacchetti said. "Dizziness with a heart rate of 180 would be approached very differently from the same complaint with a heart rate of 30. At present, activity trackers are not considered approved medical devices and use of their information to make medical decisions is at the clinician's own discretion. However, the increased use of these devices has the potential to provide emergency physicians with objective clinical information prior to the patient's arrival at the emergency department."
 
 
 

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Report: Sam’s Club seeks higher-net worth members

BY Gina Acosta
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